Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

BRM Porsche 962C Review, Double Track Test

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • BRM Porsche 962C Review, Double Track Test

    BRM Porsche 962C

    by

    Glenn (Sportblazer350) & Mike (LSIntegra94)






    Right away, the cars drove very smoothly, as we gradually increased speed, not knowing how they would perform. After a few tumbles and de-slots, we got used to these cars quickly. They were very evenly matched on the commercial track. A long straight into a banked turn and lots of wide and tight turns on this track gave us the opportunity to really check out how these cars could perform.



    Read the rest here..








  • #2
    Good work guys.

    Nice work guys!!!

    I finished my review of the Advan last week. Only had Sport track to run it on. They don't like the Carrera banked curves...unless you don't mind loosing the front air splitters on the front corners. Mag or non mag they are great cars. I prefer non mag on the Sport track. The car was easier to roll through the tight turns.

    They need to get the 1/32's a going now.

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree!

      This review is spot on. I finally got around to assembling the Momo car last night, and this is a wonderful 1:24 car. It's very well thought-out, with quality components. If there is a complaint it's that the body looks a little 'plasticky' for my tastes, but that won't stop me from buying another one.

      It's a lot of money for a kit, but I'd recommend to anyone that they see one up close and drive one on the track before saying yes or no to spending the money. This is a very, very nice car.

      Comment


      • #4
        Great Review, fun cars.

        Thanks for the review Mike and Glen.

        Thanks also for the others who have commented on these cars.

        As the Importer for BRM I am curious regarding the plastic comment, how do you feel BRM could avoid this appearance issue, less gloss in the paint ( maybe a more matte finish ) or any other ideas.

        They (BRM) are an exciting new Company in the Model (Slot) Racing Industry and they are listening.

        Also they will be attending iHobby Expo and the SCI-Scaleracing Event in Chicago October 18th-21st.

        Come on out and chat with Francesco and I about how we can regrow the 1/24th end of this Hobby.

        Also enter the BRM Challenge and win a Special Decorated BRM Car.
        Last edited by Scaleracing; 08-27-2007, 11:49 AM.
        Alan Smith
        SCI Owner.
        www.scaleracing.com
        www.slotcarillustrated.com
        www.facebook.com/scaleracingcenter
        www.132slotcar.us

        1-253-255-1807

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Scaleracing View Post
          As the Importer for BRM I am curious regarding the plastic comment, how do you feel BRM could avoid this appearance issue, less gloss in the paint ( maybe a more matte finish ) or any other ideas.
          Alan, I wish I knew more about painting, but I simply don't. They are extremely shiny, and reducing the gloss may be the answer. Regardless, I'm very satisfied with this car. I think it's safe to say that anybody who has bought a Carrera or AutoArt 1:24 car owes it to themselves to check out the BRM offerings carefully.

          Comment


          • #6
            To each his own...

            Looking at Blair M's MOMO 962C again, (It is sitting on its side on top of my TV) I can see Kurt's point. It is a very bright red, while accurate, doesn't look quite right. The Slot.it McLaren has had similar comments. I found, after stripping my F1 GTR, that some of the parts were produced in black and undercoated in white first. Those were the parts of the car that looked a lot better... maybe an undercoat of white is the simplest solution.

            In most plastic kit circles, the amount of work done to make parts fit together is overshadowed by the absolute necessity of a mirror finish, often to the detriment of accuracy or build quality... I have painted a few slot cars over the last year. Some of the earlier ones had a bit of a semi-gloss finish and generally the first comment was that the model wasn't shiny, despite the amount of hacking I had done to create an accurate model... so to avoid this, a thick, glossy coat of Tamiya clear has been applied to everything since... whether I like it or not!

            Kerry

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by PT Fan View Post
              I have painted a few slot cars over the last year. Some of the earlier ones had a bit of a semi-gloss finish and generally the first comment was that the model wasn't shiny, despite the amount of hacking I had done to create an accurate model...so to avoid this, a thick, glossy coat of Tamiya clear has been applied to everything since... whether I like it or not!
              I find that people who expect a mirror finish on a model race car, have never seen 1:1 race cars up close and personal at a racing event.

              They are most certainly NOT show quality and most certainly NOT super glossy.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yeah, they're like trucks at a construction site. These are working vehicles -- all business. And I would think that gloss and glare would be a problem for drivers.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Clear coats are usually high gloss, but duller clear coats can be bought at hobby shops which deal with military and railroad modelling. In those circles, gloss is not welcome. A too-shiny slot car can easily be resprayed, as long as you mask or remove the clear windows first.

                  Another reason that some slot cars look toy-like (and I do not know if BRM suffers this way) is that the plastic under the paint is translucent, and the paint itself is translucent. When light hits it, the light penetrates the surface and is reflected back from deep inside the plastic. Result: the car looks like it is plastic. The only way to fix this is to completely repaint the model with opaque paint. Tamiya paint tends to be translucent; Floquil tends to be more opaque. A good solution is to prime the model with a fully opaque gray or white base coat, then spray with more translucent top coats.
                  Last edited by Robert Livingston; 08-28-2007, 06:46 AM.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X