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Motor limit on N-digital ??

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  • Motor limit on N-digital ??

    I posted this on the Digital boards but I'll post here also. I think I read some where theirs a 23,500 motor limit on N-Digital? Anyone know of this? The reason? Can it be exceeded? Thanks guys.

  • #2
    I have never seen a published spec for N-Digital motor limits. And if there were it would likely be specified as maximum current -- not RPM's. Regardless, if there is a practical limit, 'Phil from Aus' would have discovered it by now.

    Michael

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    • #3
      Gentlemen,
      NINCO's NC-10 "Exceeder" motor is 26,000 rpm. There's no stated rpm limit for the N-Digital system, and it's been used with motors over 30,000 rpm with no problem. But keep in mind that the system is warranted for use with NINCO components.
      I agree with mfogg about excessive current draw being a potential limiting factor, but the single 3 amp power supply that comes with N-Digital has more then enough reserve to handle 4 cars at a time. Cheap, electrically "dirty" motors are potentially more problematic than very high rpm.

      Bob/NINCO1

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      • #4
        Originally posted by NINCO1 View Post
        Gentlemen,
        NINCO's NC-10 "Exceeder" motor is 26,000 rpm. There's no stated rpm limit for the N-Digital system, and it's been used with motors over 30,000 rpm with no problem. But keep in mind that the system is warranted for use with NINCO components.
        I agree with mfogg about excessive current draw being a potential limiting factor, but the single 3 amp power supply that comes with N-Digital has more then enough reserve to handle 4 cars at a time. Cheap, electrically "dirty" motors are potentially more problematic than very high rpm.

        Hi,

        Then could it be the power required to run Hi RPM motor. I have put a NSR King 46 on a digital system and I have tried 2 different chip and the car is jerking and never get going. If I take the rear wheel off the ground, it does the same thing and eventually gets going. Nothing is robbing in some short that could cause friction to a point that it would be the cause.

        Any idea ?

        Thanks in advance

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        • #5
          I have no idea. Does the motor have any noise suppression components attached (across the poles)?

          Bob/NINCO1

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          • #6
            I have lots of cars that have those. Their supposed to make the motor's run cooler? Right?
            Scally's have them as well as Carrera's.?
            I have not experienced that sputtering no running problem. The ones I have are all stock low RPM motors. Nothing above 24,000.
            I have a 29,000 Cartrix and a 35,000 Slot-it I'll be trying soon. Keep ya posted.

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            • #7
              Max,
              They have nothing to do with making the motor run cooler. Certain regulations dealing with electrical interference dictate levels of acceptable electrical interference; like static on an AM Radio. The components on your motors are there for noise (electrical sparks, etc) suppression. Due to the manufacturing process, these components are not the highest grade. They are there to reduce or eliminate any little sparks that can occur where electricity "jumps" from one contact surface to another, (like between the motor brushes and contacts and between the track rails and the braids. If these components fail, they can short out the "chip".
              NINCO motors happen to be electrically "very clean". Older manufactured NINCO motors only have a single RF Choke (it looks like a little green resistor) soldered to one of the motor terminals. Recently manufactured NINCO motors do not have any.

              Bob/NINCO1

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              • #8
                Thanks for the heads up Bob. Is there a ninco motor I could change to that's a short can style with around 24'000 rpm? Gotta protect those expensive chips.

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                • #9
                  Nothing in the 24k area...
                  There is the brand new, 20,000 rpm NC-9 "Sparker" motor, arriving this week.

                  Bob/NINCO1

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                  • #10
                    Funny they called it a "Sparker", when sparks are the enemy.

                    NINCO NC-9 Sparker (FK-130, short can) [16,216 RPM/12v] 20,000 RPM/14.8v
                    [118 gcm/12v] 145 gcm/14.8v
                    4.8W/12v

                    Bob, have Ninco motors been specifically cleaned up so they no longer need external RF suppressors? It is common in RC (with servos) to use capacitors across the motor brushes to eliminate noise generated by motors, which disrupts control functions. I assume the same holds for digital slot cars. Improved commutator and brush design would help.

                    Every Ninco motor I've tested has been a smooth runner.

                    This is the fastest Ninco motor I have listed, aside from the obsolete NC4:

                    NINCO NC-10 (FK-180, long can) [21,081 RPM/12v] 26,000 RPM/14.8v
                    [243 gcm/12v] 300 gcm/14.8v
                    12.8W/12v

                    Is the NC10 available?
                    Last edited by Robert Livingston; 05-30-2009, 08:13 AM.

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                    • #11
                      The Ninco NC-10 is available.

                      Best regards,
                      Brian

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                      • #12
                        Robert,
                        You have a solid reputation for being very knowledgeable about slot car motors and your testing and evaluation has been extremely helpful to many racers in the hobby.
                        NINCO has chosen to remove the single 2mh choke from their motors due to the quality of the components and overall minimal rf noise generation from the commutator/contacts.
                        As you've said, smoothness of NINCO motors has always been a strongpoint, and reliability and longevity are words often used by racers that use them.
                        If the company's testing calls for a return of suppression components, I'm sure they will include them.
                        The 26,000 rpm NC-10 "Exceeder" is available. The part # is 80615 and the MSRP is $25.98.

                        Bob/NINCO1

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