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How do Cartrix cars run on Ninco track?

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  • #16
    Yes, I've seen some that this causes unnecessary binding, and some where it hasn't been much of a problem at all. Some cars will hardly turn the front axle because of all the friction.

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    • #17
      Ninco Porsche 934

      Bob,

      Now we are back on Ninco I am very happy with the car. It runs well on Scaley track with no magnet. Tires are magic are they std. or Shore?. So good infact that I took the 19x10's off the front and use them on the rear of my Sloter/MB slot Lola. Replaced the front with Hobbyslot conical tires as they were what I had.

      I am still with ElSecundo on this that there is shear force when the shocks are pressing on the axle. I haven't shimmed out the excess play yet but the axle does not spin freely. As I said in my PM I am going to buy some doubles to try.

      The other thing my friend noticed as well as the friction is the height of the car we know it is a '70's car but it is very high. He complains about most cars especially scaley being too high. I might do a chop on the body posts but I kinda like it standard. Any modified car can go fast.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Abarth Mike View Post
        As I said in my PM I am going to buy some doubles to try.
        Go for it, I think that will help.

        Come to think of it, I may do that myself...

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        • #19
          Mike,
          got your PM....
          The tires are not Shores
          Just like in the world of full size cars, with slot cars there are many ways of improving looks and performance to satisfy each individuals needs. Something may "jump out" to one person that isn't noticed by another.
          Case in point: You mentioned the ride height that your friend noticed and is something HE complains about... something that didn't occur or bother you at all.
          Like Kurt said, "go for it".
          Last edited by NINCO1; 05-21-2009, 06:29 AM.

          Bob/NINCO1

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          • #20
            I'm probably way wrong, but I thought the word Shore, was a descriptive reference of the compound elasticity or resiliency in tires. Fore instance Shore 1 is really soft vs Shore 10 which would be very hard.

            Greg

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            • #21
              Greg,
              You are correct.
              "Shore" hardness specifies methods for determining the hardness of materials by means of durometers of two types: type A for softer materials and type D for harder materials.
              60 Shore A is softer than 70.... 70 Shore A is the standard.... 90 Shore A is very stiff. The hardness is obtained by comparing the difference between a small initial force and a much larger final force. The International Rubber Hardness Degrees (IRHD) scale has a range of 0 to 100. Shore A for commercial type applications are generally from 30 on up. So Shore A25 is extremely soft.
              The term "Shores" was being used in the post to refer to NINCO's soft, "grippy" Prorace tires, with a Shore rating of A25.... that are commonly called NINCO "Shores".

              Bob/NINCO1

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              • #22
                Thanks for the explanation Bob. So in this case "Shore" is a marketing term.I hadn't thought of that.

                Greg

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Slider2 View Post
                  Thanks for the explanation Bob. So in this case "Shore" is a marketing term.I hadn't thought of that.

                  Greg
                  Greg,

                  Sorry I started that.

                  I'm not sure (sic) that Shore is a marketing term. Ninco, Slot.it and other say BRM (132slot) all have tires which they clasify with a Shore rating, a softness test named after the inventor of the Durometer (used to use one to buy Kart tires back in the day)

                  Using Shore rating for model tires comes from R/C racing I think, **** there goes my non marketing argument Anyway using it in slot cars may come from Europe. Slot.it has P1 through 6 which get progressively softer and are marketed for different track surfaces as you probably know but who knows what compound they are. They all seem to be getting progressively softer. Since P6 came out they are a must have on plastic track those or UL. So to make it all sound more technical, **** marketing agian. Someone came up with the idea of making tires quoting shore numbers. For all I know Slot.it Shore 15 is the same compound as P6. But how does one know until one has tried.

                  Oh Ok I give up it is a marketing term.

                  Shore numbers if the quoted values are correct would ensure that if class rules say Shore 25 tires for instance one could use different manufactures tires and yet still comply with regs.

                  Slot car racers call them Shore tires to differenciate them from others.

                  What a thread. From Cartrix Vintage GP cars to polymer hardness.

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                  • #24
                    Shore is the name of the scale used to quantify hardness. It was developed for soft materials such as rubber. Shore 25 is usually described as the hardness (softness) of a rubber band.

                    Since the hardness scale was applied to slot car tires, people have started using it as if it described the compound. It only describes the hardness. Different slot car tire compounds could have the same Shore hardness and have very different grip on the same surface (such as rubber vs. urethane vs. silicone).

                    All tires have a Shore rating, but we may not know what it is, if the tire was not tested. Technically, the word Shore should be followed or preceded by the numeric rating, otherwise the word is meaningless. It's as if someone told you how hot it was by saying "degrees" without a number.

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                    • #25
                      In the 2009 Ninco catalog, it lists the Shore rating for the Ninco tires -

                      ProRace - A25
                      Standard - A45
                      Standard LP (laprene) - A40

                      Best regards,
                      Brian

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                      • #26
                        I think what happened, at least in the case with Ninco, was that they offered Shore-rated tires with one and only one Shore rating. So people who didn't know that 'shore' was more than just a descriptive word, used the word 'shore' to reference the tires.

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