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Upgrade motor for the Ninco 1 C6R vette

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  • #16
    Bob, the new NC-13 should give you what you want. It's designed as an upgrade for the
    NINCO 1's, whose chassis and drive train components were not designed for "prorace type" upgrades. You'll have the additional rpm's in a motor with only 155 gm/cm of torque... plenty of power, yet driveable. Stretch the guide spring and flatten the brushes or change to softer brushes.

    Bob/NINCO1

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    • #17
      Originally posted by ElSecundo View Post
      I'd like to see that!
      Hi Secundo

      The Proslot Euro in place.... Had to open up the endbell hole to take the motor then hot glued the motor with the original metal pinion. Set up the axle with a spacer (axle bearing). Alloy wheels and NSR tyres on rear.

      Need to drill chassis for two motor screws so I can bolt the motor in also.

      I ended up using a Ninco 1 Megane chassis as I presume it will handle a bit better. Just guessed the lead might be needed ??

      Just wondered what will happen when I test it out
      Accelerates well, guide keeps coming out, perhaps a little lead up front !

      Last edited by Locura; 01-30-2012, 12:00 PM.

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      • #18
        The Ninco NC-13 was exactly what the vette needed. With no other modifications except a slight relocation of the downforce magnet it now runs right with the Scaley and SCX vettes and other GT cars in my collection. But spending $52 initially and then another $25 for the proper motor hurts my wallet and sense of proper value. Any future purchases of entry level cars will be of another brand unless the Ninco1 line switches motors.

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        • #19
          Yeah, I'd say that the Ninco1 cars weren't what you were looking for.

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          • #20
            I just tried a NINCO 10 tooth brass pinion gear in my NINCO 1 slot car and it runs with more top speed on larger, faster tracks.

            I think for a NINCO 1 slot car to truly be appreciated, it most likely needs to run on a NINCO track where the car really shines. Each NINCO 1 slot car that I have purchased have plastic wheels that run true on the axle and run very good on my NINCO track with or without the traction magnet.

            Best regards,
            Brian

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            • #21
              Ninco just needs to put the stock nc-11 in the cars. You dont go down to your local chevy dealer and complain the stock motor dont cut it for race applications, You take that motor out and hop it up!!! Most people like the mild motors, For the speed demons out there you got to pay more to go faster.

              Ninco 1s are some of the best non mag cars out there for n-digital no need to screw that up!!

              Regalman82

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              • #22
                Originally posted by regalman82 View Post
                Ninco just needs to put the stock nc-11 in the cars. You dont go down to your local chevy dealer and complain the stock motor dont cut it for race applications, You take that motor out and hop it up!!! Most people like the mild motors, For the speed demons out there you got to pay more to go faster.

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                • #23
                  I've been buying and racing slot cars since 1965 and I don't remember ever buying one for Sunday driving. The livery on the Ninco1 Corvette C6R indicates it is a race car. If I went to Chevrolet and bought a C6R intending to race it and found out at the track they had put a stock street engine in it I would be upset, especially if the price I had paid for said C6R was considerably more than what I could have gotten a street vette for. But these are slot cars and my only issue was that it could not keep up with considerably cheaper C6Rs from other manufacturers all stock right out of the box. Now that I am familiar with the Ninco1 line I will leave them to those who don't race slot cars.

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                  • #24
                    Just starting to race my Ninco 1 megane (Mc Gregor) with the Proslot Euro motor in, and have added a little lead to weight in strategic places (as you do) and enjoying driving something different. Not sure about the guide, but a lovely bodyshell. NSR wheels and tyres.
                    Everyone likes something different in life !!!

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Modlerbob View Post
                      I've been buying and racing slot cars since 1965 and I don't remember ever buying one for Sunday driving. The livery on the Ninco1 Corvette C6R indicates it is a race car. If I went to Chevrolet and bought a C6R intending to race it and found out at the track they had put a stock street engine in it I would be upset, especially if the price I had paid for said C6R was considerably more than what I could have gotten a street vette for. But these are slot cars and my only issue was that it could not keep up with considerably cheaper C6Rs from other manufacturers all stock right out of the box. Now that I am familiar with the Ninco1 line I will leave them to those who don't race slot cars.
                      In 1:1, EVERYTHING with a motor is raced, including lawn mowers. Just because it doesn't have a motor fast enough for your standards doesn't mean it isn't a great racing machine. "For those of us who don't race slot cars?" Really?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Modlerbob View Post
                        ...unless the Ninco1 line switches motors.
                        Bob, you may want to pick up the NINCO 1 PLUS Mercedes SLS GT3. Even if you're not wild about the particular model, it could be an indicator of whether or not any NINCO 1 cars are in your future. It comes with a motor that is virtually identical to the NC-13 in performance and the same adjustable motor mount (pod) featured in the Lightning SPORT cars. I'm guessing that it will have the performance that you want along with a more flexible upgrade path if it's needed. I'm confident that there will be more of these and I believe that this marks an new point in the NINCO 1 line for those who want more performance. And, they are priced less than some recent NINCO 1 releases. I've seen them at Internet retailers for about $46.

                        _michael

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                        • #27
                          I didn't intend to make a Federal case out of this and I was willing to let this end eight posts ago. I wish one of you lived nearby so you could have witnessed just how slow this car really was before the motor swap. Maybe I'll send the motor to one of you as I have no further use for it. The car wasn't just slow, it was pathetically slow. Maybe I got a dud motor and it has tainted my opinion. Every other Ninco slot car I have bought has had a very stout motor. Since they are sealed I can't open it up to determine if it has a problem.

                          I bought the car because it had a livery that I liked and the execution of the shape, paint and markings is excellent and now that I put the NC-13 motor in it I can race it with my other cars in that class. I am interested in the Mercedes SLS GT3 and I may get one owing to it having a different motor.

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                          • #28
                            Bob,

                            What was the track voltage that used when you drove the NINCO 1 slot car?

                            On my track, racing without the traction magnet, the lap times for the NINCO 1 slot cars are in the 6.20/6.35 second range and the NINCO slot cars with a NC-5 motor are in the 5.70/5.80 second range.

                            Best regards,
                            Brian

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Modlerbob View Post
                              I didn't intend to make a Federal case out of this and I was willing to let this end eight posts ago. I wish one of you lived nearby so you could have witnessed just how slow this car really was before the motor swap. Maybe I'll send the motor to one of you as I have no further use for it. The car wasn't just slow, it was pathetically slow. Maybe I got a dud motor and it has tainted my opinion. Every other Ninco slot car I have bought has had a very stout motor. Since they are sealed I can't open it up to determine if it has a problem.

                              I bought the car because it had a livery that I liked and the execution of the shape, paint and markings is excellent and now that I put the NC-13 motor in it I can race it with my other cars in that class. I am interested in the Mercedes SLS GT3 and I may get one owing to it having a different motor.
                              The NC-11 is no dud, provided you are racing in a class where similar performance motors are used. Maybe you are unaware that many racers search out NC1-performance motors just so they can race with 13-15k, low torque motors. Racing is every bit as serious and close as it is in the faster motor classes. M/T Racing, H&R Racing, BWA, and others have filled the void left by the demise of the NC1.

                              Ninco has alienated many Classic racers because they have chosen to sell their 1960's racers with NC5 power, which is thought to be excessive by the NC1 adherents. Now they have come back with an NC1-level motor, but they don't supply it as the RTR motor in those Classics. I believe it is in the C6R because that is intended as a lower performing car. I have one tricked out as a police car and it is plenty fast, although obviously not a competitor against cars with three times the power.

                              I, too, started racing c. 1964, and when I rejoined the hobby c. 2004 I was hell bent on re-motoring everything to the unlimited-power standard we had used back then. Eventually I found that anything over 10 watts power output (the level of a Slot.It orange endbell) was wasted on 10-12 volt wood track racing, no magnets. And then I found that 13-15k motors on 12v were a great way to go racing, so I'm out of the fast classes now. They just look too fast, much as magnet cars looked too fast in 2004.
                              Last edited by Robert Livingston; 02-09-2012, 12:41 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Slow Bette's

                                Hi All- I also have two vettes with the N-11 motors. They are extremely slow in amateur mode and can be driven around the track full throttle without desolating. However in pro mode they turn respectable lap times and have to be driven. As long as you are racing N-11 against N-11 it is stii fun and challenging. Against other cars forget about it.

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