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thinking of changing to ninco from scaley!

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  • thinking of changing to ninco from scaley!

    looking into getting a ninco set but only have about 150 limit to spend atm, i have scaley track but don't fancy having a mix of track and want to eventually run N-DIGITAL! what are the advantages of ninco over scaley?

  • #2
    Track has the best conductivity in the business.
    Supports 8 Cars.
    No need to drill a hole in the chassis for an Ident LED.

    Other than that Scalextric SSD, plus aftermarket add ons, beat it on any other parameter you can think of.


    Rich

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    • #3
      cheers for that, what is the track like for grip?

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      • #4
        Track has a lot of grip, many people think too much, but it's a personal taste thing.

        Rich

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        • #5
          As much as I support all brands, I can't disagree with Rich on those points.
          You'll have to think seriously about what appeals to you about N-Digital over SSD or any other system.
          If you're interested in digital at all, I highly recommend Dave Chang's new book, "Digital Slot Car Racing in 1/32 Scale". It's very fair and balanced and complete, and a thorough reading will help anyone decide what system is best for them.

          Like Rich said, Ninco track has a TON of grip. You can run pretty much any tire on it, even old and dry ones, and they'll still have good enough grip to get around. Softer tires will literally wear down with too much use. The surface is literally tiny pyramids, and is shown clearly in Dave's book. If you've never run a car on Ninco, and are used to Scalextric, you should seriously consider finding someone local with Ninco that you can run on their track. It's a HUGE difference, and some don't like it (as Rich said) while some love it and dislike slipperier tracks like Scalextric and Carrera.
          Last edited by MrFlippant; 06-15-2012, 02:45 PM.

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          • #6
            I currently run N-Digital, and I like it very much. The guys have covered it nicely.

            A couple things worth mentioning:

            1) N-Digital requires excellent conductivity and clean rails, probably more than any other brand. Be prepared for the work involved to keep it clean. I recently found what works best for me -- one of those white erasers used by draftsmen.

            2) Ninco hasn't added any new N-Digital components in the last year, and there's some question whether they'll really be supporting it, or further developing it.

            That said, if you're interested, I could probably get you started with N-Digital less expensively than any other route to N-Digital. I have an extra N-Digital powerbase and set of lane changers, and I have a few chips and controllers lying around. But there's no rush, take your time investigating the systems you'd be interested in trying. I'll hang onto it for a while, so let me know if and when you're ready.

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            • #7
              i like the idea of having a track that creates tire wear gives a sense of realism, i love the idea you can run 8 cars instead of 6. i raced on ninco many years back and loved it. i only bought scaley for convenience tbh

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              • #8
                Hehe, I prefer simulated tire wear, but if you like replacing tires because they're really worn, then more power to you. ;-)

                I'd take ElSecundo up on that offer if I had any Ninco track to put it together with.

                ElSecundo, have you not tried INOX MX3 yet? Seriously... try it.

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                • #9
                  Yeah, the tire wear is kind of cool in an endurance event, and it's nice when the track trues your tires for you. But wow, it's a lot of tire wear. With relatively soft tires like the shore A25s, you need to replace tires about every 5 hours in no-mag running.

                  I haven't tried the INOX yet, but the eraser was so easy and such a big improvement, I might stick with that. Really inexpensive, too.

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                  • #10
                    how did you use an eraser to create tires?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lukeyboy900 View Post
                      how did you use an eraser to create tires?
                      I use the eraser to clean the track for digital racing.

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                      • #12
                        I won't bang the drum any more than to ask you how often you need to use the eraser? Is it more than twice a year? That's about how often I clean my track any more, and even then it's not because it needs it, but because I think I should.

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                        • #13
                          my track will be a perm/semi perm layout and by semi perm i mean it will be on a board permanently but have to be moved out of the way, i guess ninco is the best track for this as there are so many people/clubs that run ninco even the kyosho Dslot43 track is ninco lol

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MrFlippant View Post
                            I won't bang the drum any more than to ask you how often you need to use the eraser? Is it more than twice a year? That's about how often I clean my track any more, and even then it's not because it needs it, but because I think I should.
                            I've actually only tried it once, and the effect was great. I haven't run digital since, so I don't know if it's a good solution. Does INOX leave some sort of conductive coating on the track? How does it prevent further oxidation for 6 months at a time? If it can do the same here, I'd certainly be willing to try it!

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                            • #15
                              Think of INOX MX3 like WD-40 without the stickiness and other drawbacks. It never dries out, and only a fine coat (e.g. applied and then "wiped off") is needed. It is an oxidization blocker, like other oils. It's technically non-conductive, but benefits the rail to braid connection in the same way that a dielectric grease aids battery terminal and other connections. It's a metallurgical thing I barely understand, really. So far, pretty much everyone who has tried it has seen a noticeable improvement in car performance AND track longevity (e.g. not having to clean it before a race, or weekly/daily), except Carrera (stainless steel rails), though even they have found continuity improvements between tracks with INOX MX3 seeping into the joins a little.

                              Most people find it hard to believe until they try it. The proof of the pudding is in the eating. Consider the fact that our very own Alan Smith has bought into it, sells bottles through his store, and uses it on all kinds of slot-car related things. A sample of this stuff should come with every set, especially digital.

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