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Building the Scaleauto 1/24th BMW Z4 White Kit SC - 7031

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  • Building the Scaleauto 1/24th BMW Z4 White Kit SC - 7031

    Building theScaleauto 1/24 BMW Z4 White kit SC - 7031

    PART 1 ON ASSEMBLING THE WHITE KIT

    BY SLOTBUTTON



    Here we have the familiar Scaleauto white kit packaging. Those of you that have read my previous build threads will know I like this type of packaging for cars I am going to race.

    READ MORE
    Last edited by slotbutton; 04-23-2013, 11:43 PM.

  • #2
    Hey Darren,

    Even though I don't really have a lot of intrest in these cars, that is a really well presented article!

    Might even convince me to get one!

    Cheers, Tony.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Tony

      Might even convince me to get one!
      I was only going to get one!

      The plus side is if you have one chassis all the different body styles can be mounted on it. At least that was my theory - somehow I have 4 chassis's now

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks Darren. Your exploded diagrams are wonderful. They make assembly so much easier. I do enjoy building these kits as the design and manufacture of the kit is so good. The added bonus is that they are such great running cars too with close racing between all the body styles. For me more fun to drive than the 1/32!!!

        I wonder what Scaleracing rules should be regarding the front winglets. I mean to say why not just leave them off the car. This is arguably better aesthetically than the unsightly shoe glue around the winglet to stop it being knocked off during racing. I can go either way. In the real world they can get damaged during a race and that affects the cars speed.Not true in our world. On balance I think we should race with them fitted. The kit looks good. I prefer to buy the kit and then paint myself. I have a Z4 which arrived yesterday and do not know the livery just yet. Are you going to get the Z4 running for 4 may?

        Comment


        • #5
          The winglets are dependent on the livery, personally I like them on the kits. My M3 managed to race for 24 hours before destroying them!

          I will be running the Audi R8 for the May race, hopefully it is on pace with the Porsches. Will also be interesting to see how the steel chassis performs and how the plastic pinion holds up!

          Comment


          • #6
            The part you say is not needed in image 019.jpg is the 'flappy paddle' gear shifter.
            From the available pictures, it looks like it should be mounted behind the steering wheel, but above the steering column.
            If there are no holes, perhaps they need to be opened like those for the front fender airsplitter fins.

            That suggestion aside, this is a great break down with a plethora of detailed information.
            Last edited by jonny5; 06-04-2013, 07:38 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have considered that and will see if it fits during assembly. On previous builds it was a better fit and more obvious. Now that my other commitments are behind me I may get around to finishing this!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by slotbutton View Post
                T I will be running the Audi R8 for the May race, hopefully it is on pace with the Porsches. Will also be interesting to see how the steel chassis performs and how the plastic pinion holds up!
                Yeah ... Please keep us appraised on how that works out !
                I am somewhat dismayed, that we slotcarsluts, have to wonder about the "wisdom", of making a change to something that intuitively seems a step backwards...

                SA drivetrains (and BRM) need to be made more robust (hardened alloy in the spur gear hubs, machined flats on axles... Perhaps hardened "drill bit" steel used ...

                But I digress...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Not sure in the wisdom of metal is best. I have run a number of these Scaleauto cars and the whle chassis mechanical package is very robust. The body is a different story. How ever that is not really fair either. The car needs to be driven with a respect of the body construction style. Too often we seem to be impervious to the potential damage the body will suffer due to over driving the car. I like the scale accuracy and am happy driving to finish the race. In the real world a smashed up car does not usually drive as fast as a pristine car and I like this being replicated in our scale world. The cars are not delicate they just need driving with a view to keeping the car in one piece. This is ok by me.

                  Now BRM in line gears are slightly different. Over drive these cars and the crown can quickly wear out. It is a known issue and the car needs to be driven with this weakness in mind. Again there are real race cars with similar issues which drivers have to drive around and this is one in our scale world. I think the answer to the problem is a side winder/angle winder chassis. Perhaps BRM can re-engineer the Group C cars in this style? I think it could well re-energise this class.

                  From a rather limited experience at Tacoma I would put the Scaleauto Porsche Rally style as the fastest of these cars. My sense is even driving the wheels off the Jaguar, BMW M3 / Z4, Audi and Mercedes are not quite up to the pace of the pooch. In some lanes there was nothing to choose between them. But the one lane that favoured the Porsche really favoured the porsche. I drove the Audi with Darren and no matter how hard Darren drove he could not best the Porsches.

                  Great cars I love driving them. This last time was the first time I drove a BRM and enjoyed the driving experience. Darren had the Coke 962 and it went like a dream. For my tastes I find the BRM's to be a little more knife edge to drive. One minute there there and the next they are gone, if you catch my drift. Where as the Scaleautos are a very forgiving car to drive.

                  The Scaleauto cars are just fine in my books. By their nature they need race preparation. This again is just like a real race car. Instead of wire and similar preventative actions to keep the race car together these cars need flatten axles, loctite and bobs your uncle it's off to the races. Before racing any car I want to pull it apart and put it back together again. So fine by me.

                  Lots of fun

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for the constructive and accurate answer Daniel.
                    My 2 bits:

                    The new plastic pinion held up fine and I didn't even superglue it in place as suggested. On the 132Slotcar track I firmly believe the pecking order to be Porsche GT3 then RSR and then pretty much any of the other GT cars. The advantage is in how you can drive the outside lanes for the most part and how consistent/forgiving the Porsches are. The point has been discussed at length and while I agree all the cars can turn laptimes very close to one another the median laptime on the Porsches is always faster! I do believe though that the Z4 might be the GT to topple the Porsches. Hope to have mine ready by the next event. The SA drivetrain is plenty durable enough and as Daniel said if you drive within the limits of the BRM's the drivetrain is also plenty durable. The Coke car we raced now has around 70 - 80 hours on it with I believe the 4/5 crown gear - most only changed for the start of longer races. YMMV

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A few more (Z4) white kit tips

                      Gents
                      As an addition to Darren's excellent article, here are some of my findings as a result of building my Z4.
                      Some of these tips will also apply for other types of Scaleauto bodies.

                      Rear diffuser

                      For bending the retainer tabs of the P.E mesh use a small set of pliers with beaks about the same width as the tabs.
                      Do not bend the tabs where it would be most natural to do so ! Like I did in the picture below...



                      ...as this will result in a small gap between the mesh and the plastic diffuser.
                      Not only is this ugly, but it will set your diffuser to be lower than it should be...which will be lower than your chassis.


                      Instead use your pliers and slide them a bit over the tabs onto the mesh..then bend the tabs including a small part of the Mesh.
                      This way the Mesh will fit snugly onto the diffuser. In my case it took several fittings before I was satisfied with the result.
                      I then used Zapp thick CA to glue the PE mesh to the diffuser.
                      I strenghtened the bonding by pouring some micro bubbles onto the drying CA, quickly blowing away the exces bubbles before the CA set.
                      This way you create a strong sub assembly of the diffuser which can be painted satin black.
                      Take care to mask of the areas which will be glued to the body, same goes for the corresponding areas on the body itself.

                      Contact patches and (neoprene) glue.

                      Neoprene contact glue (or shoe goo) will created a better bond if you glue the bare metal to bare plastic.
                      Not that it will not bond to painted surfaces, but in a crash the paint will blister off...and so will your diffuser.
                      If you forgot to mask these areas, take a sharp scalpel and scratch away any paint on the contact patches were needed.

                      H-plate shims
                      New for the Z4 are the Flanged "T-nuts" (We know them as T-hulsen)
                      Scaleauto prefers to call them Body Suspension supports, hey what's in a name
                      Anyhow they come with 2 Plastic shimm's each. Now in Darren's picture both are placed above the H-plate.
                      I.M.O. at least one of these should be placed under the H-plate....

                      On my side of the pond we generally place at least the tiniest spacer under an H-plate.
                      (Our rules allow the use of the Plafit /Sigma 3mm spacers that come in 0,13/0,25 /0,5 mm thickness)
                      While this does raise the H-plate and body (and subsequently moves the CG up) the advantage is that the H-plate rest squarely on four points.

                      This is one of the most important areas on any Scaleauto set-up.
                      You've got 1/3rd of the total mass of your car resting on these 4 points...
                      ...or wobbling on at least one of them if you've got a bent chassis or H-plate.

                      Also shimm's under the H-plate will prevent it from rocking on any tyre debris deposits on the chassis.




                      So far the general aplpication of the H-plate Shims...for the Z4 there's an other reason to raise the body a bit...as can be seen in the picture below.
                      With the H-plate in its stock position (flat on the chassis) there's but a whee bit of clearance between the bottom of the interior and the top of the motor.
                      Even less if you have the mounting pegs of the driver, the seat and the rollcage sticking out underneath.



                      When the car is stationary it clears the motor, but when it runs, the slightest rocking on acceleration or under braking will cause it to hit the motor.
                      This is a small design error, which Scaleauto has noticed as the second Z4 white kit I got came with 4 extra metal shimm's.
                      These are meant to be placed under the H-plate or between the plastic body-mount pillars and the metal body holders.



                      On Shoe goo and Z4 winglets
                      Originally posted by dansula View Post
                      I wonder what Scaleracing rules should be regarding the front winglets.
                      I mean to say why not just leave them off the car.
                      This is arguably better aesthetically than the unsightly shoe glue around the winglet to stop it being knocked off during racing.
                      Last but not least, a tip for the winglet lovers
                      The Z4 winglets have quite long mounting pegs which will protrude some way inside the body.
                      A dab of Shoe goo on the inside of the body will secure them quite well...
                      ..and is is arguably better aesthetically than the unsightly shoe glue around the winglet on the outside of the body

                      A final tip on Shoe goo, try to get hold of the Gel type of Shoe Goo
                      Its less messy on the fingers and easier to apply in small doses and will run less, so less chance of accidentally damaging already painted or clear parts.

                      That's its for 2 night

                      with kind regards
                      Tamar
                      Last edited by tamar.nelwan; 06-11-2013, 06:01 AM. Reason: Typo's

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Tamar
                        Great update, thank you

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for the tips Tamar, I will set up the chassis as you mentioned. In the paint process now so will conclude the article when the decals arrive.

                          Couple of questions:

                          What are or is Micro bubbles?
                          Is Shoe Goo gel the brand or similar to Shoe goo but a gel?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by slotbutton View Post
                            Thanks for the tips Tamar, I will set up the chassis as you mentioned. In the paint process now so will conclude the article when the decals arrive.

                            Couple of questions:

                            What are or is Micro bubbles?
                            Is Shoe Goo gel the brand or similar to Shoe goo but a gel?
                            Hello Darren
                            Sometimes its more difficult translating brands and materials than the actual languages themselves
                            Specially for the day to day stuff that is off the shelf available locally..but unheard of on other continents.

                            Micro bubbles
                            This was my best guess translation as I'd seen the term used before on Automotive forums.
                            They are miniscule resin/glass/mineral beeds or grains. They're used to give cyanoacrilic glue some substance, easy to fill larger gaps and speed up the setting process.

                            I googled a bit and finally found this site with English text



                            http://www.schwanheimer-industriekle...iller-30g.html

                            While googling I also found some references of guys using caustic soda and even johnson talk powder.
                            Apparently any form of small particle that can be encapsulated by the CA glue will do the job

                            Neoprene Glue in gel form
                            Same goes for the Neoprene glue that is so well promoted by Alan as an all bonding agent
                            The stuff I use here in holland is called Bison Kit, which is a fluid yellowish Neoprene glue that will draw sticky threads on application. It is in effect the same type of glue as used by your local shoemaker
                            Which is why most of us prefer the gel type which is called Bison tix.

                            Now my assumption was that ypur Shoe goo was quite similar, so I Googled for a Gel type and found this. But upon reading the info it says that Shoe goo is transparent...so maybe the other characteristics are different as well.



                            With kind regards
                            Tamar

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have used this on Motorcycle fairings.

                              Silica Thickener or filler, added to strong liquid glues create a very solid joint. Strong enough that when I tested the fairings would break in other places not the original repaired cracks. Some here use baking soda and that will thicken the glue, silica works even better.

                              Shoe Goo is clear, the original formula, but they also make a black which is a little more liquid. Both work well in creating a rubberized joint.
                              Alan Smith
                              SCI Owner.
                              www.scaleracing.com
                              www.slotcarillustrated.com
                              www.facebook.com/scaleracingcenter
                              www.132slotcar.us

                              1-253-255-1807

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