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  • Chipping other Manufacturers F1 Cars

    Hi all, 52 years of age and a Grandfather. Recently started to re-build a Digital track first started ten years ago. Have started to get quite obsessive about it also.

    This may seem a bit of a basic question that has been asked many times, but having searched endlessly the answer I get on the web, always seems ambiguous or I am reading it wrong.

    Basically I am building a collection of new and vintage F1 Scalextric Cars.



    I think I understand that Digital F1 cars from other manufacturers will not run on Scalextric Digital, but that the newer SCX and Carrera Analogue F1 cars can be chipped with the Scalextric single seater Digital chip to run on the track.

    Would appreciate some STRAIGHT talking clarification on this.

    Many thanks in advance

    Best regards

    Nicks Back



    http://www.slotcarillustrated.com/po...ilies/help.gif

  • #2
    Scalextric F1 chip allows may cars to be converted.

    With the small Scalextric F1 chip it is possible to modify many cars from many brands to operate on SSD. Be careful about amperage draw on motors with stock chips especially if converting high powered or heavy magnet cars.

    Ask here and I am sure people will step up and help you.
    Alan Smith
    SCI Owner.
    www.scaleracing.com
    www.slotcarillustrated.com
    www.facebook.com/scaleracingcenter
    www.132slotcar.us

    1-253-255-1807

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    • #3
      Heya, Nick! Glad you're back.
      Any car CAN be converted. The ambiguousness comes from how challenging it will be. Scalextric cars will often have chip brackets or even take the F1 DPR chip. Other brands usually don't have pre-defined locations for chips, but DO usually have somewhere to hide them.
      As Alan mentioned, some brands have motors that draw more power than a Scalextric chip is designed to take (being designed for their own motors), but again, the challenge here is to refit the chip with better electronics (something you need really good surface mount soldering skills to do), or have someone else do it for you, such a Greg Myers (gmyers) here in the states. By replacing the diodes and mosfets, an upgraded chip can handle pretty much any motor that will fit in your cars. The best news is that if you fit a stock chip and it pops, you can have the bad chip repaired/upgraded for less than the cost of a replacement, and end up with a better than new chip.

      Anyway, the challenges are also finding a good place to tuck the chip, finding a good place for the LED to peek out of the chassis on the center line nearest the guide, and routing the wires safely away from motor and body/chassis pinching.

      F1 tends to be more challenging than saloon cars, simply because there is inherently less room inside them. But, it can usually be done. Also, most cars have been chipped by someone, so searching for the brand and model of the car plus "chipping" will often find the info you need.

      You can also post specific queries here. A photo of the inside of the car (showing both inside of body shell and chassis) is usually helpful so that people who don't have that particular car can make suggestions.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MrFlippant View Post
        Heya, Nick! Glad you're back.
        Any car CAN be converted. The ambiguousness comes from how challenging it will be. Scalextric cars will often have chip brackets or even take the F1 DPR chip. Other brands usually don't have pre-defined locations for chips, but DO usually have somewhere to hide them.
        As Alan mentioned, some brands have motors that draw more power than a Scalextric chip is designed to take (being designed for their own motors), but again, the challenge here is to refit the chip with better electronics (something you need really good surface mount soldering skills to do), or have someone else do it for you, such a Greg Myers (gmyers) here in the states. By replacing the diodes and mosfets, an upgraded chip can handle pretty much any motor that will fit in your cars. The best news is that if you fit a stock chip and it pops, you can have the bad chip repaired/upgraded for less than the cost of a replacement, and end up with a better than new chip.

        Anyway, the challenges are also finding a good place to tuck the chip, finding a good place for the LED to peek out of the chassis on the center line nearest the guide, and routing the wires safely away from motor and body/chassis pinching.

        F1 tends to be more challenging than saloon cars, simply because there is inherently less room inside them. But, it can usually be done. Also, most cars have been chipped by someone, so searching for the brand and model of the car plus "chipping" will often find the info you need.

        You can also post specific queries here. A photo of the inside of the car (showing both inside of body shell and chassis) is usually helpful so that people who don't have that particular car can make suggestions.

        Many thanks for your help, saves me wasting a whole lot of money, now I can focus on specifics. Presumably Carrera and SCX F1 cars, which are widely available in the UK are "reasonably" easy to convert?

        Anyway some great reading here, and I will spread the word

        Best regards

        Nicks Back

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, Carrera and SCX F1 cars will have some room inside for a chip, especially if you get ones that are digital ready, or even if you get digital ones. You can remove and resell the chip that comes in them. Carrera and SCX people are always looking for good deals on chips.

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          • #6
            Clarity

            I have added onto this thread, because it seems to fit in with this general direction.

            So I had a discussion today with a fellow slot car racer regarding a new Carrera car I have purchased.

            He seemed to think that because it has been supplied from Carrera as 'Digital ready' that all I should do is throw it on my Scalextric Digital track, program the car, and away I go.
            My thinking was I would need to fit a Scalextric chip to replace the Carrera one before it will be able to be programmed.

            Who's right ?
            And thanks in advance for the guidance.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Monkiesuncle View Post
              He seemed to think that because it has been supplied from Carrera as 'Digital ready' that all I should do is throw it on my Scalextric Digital track, program the car, and away I go.
              My thinking was I would need to fit a Scalextric chip to replace the Carrera one before it will be able to be programmed.
              Who's right ?
              And thanks in advance for the guidance.

              "Digital Ready" means it an analog car and doesn't have a digital chip at all and will require a digital chip of your choosing to install. If you are running a Scaley track you WILL need to install a Scaley chip in your Carrera car (or any other brand) if you want digital capabilities.
              Dave

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              • #8
                A Point of "clarification " ?

                HeyFlippy ! (I'm hoping its cool to call you "Flippy", if not, please advise)

                But as a foot draggin, reluctant to go, but interested potential Digital guy...
                I need clarification on a point regarding the LED poking out under the Chassis of cars ...

                My understanding is that the downward facing LED reads signals from sensors in the track, and activates LC's and the like.

                But in a "wireless" hookup, RF signals are sent from the controller to the cars & LC's ,eliminating the LED signal reading ???

                Making the signal transmission more reliable, as the car & LC are not dependent on the "handoff" between a car flashing by, and the embedded sensor ???

                Explain it to me ... if you will please
                Last edited by ModelTrainGuy; 07-25-2015, 06:47 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ModelTrainGuy View Post
                  My understanding is that the downward facing LED reads signals from sensors in the track, and activates LC's and the like.

                  But in a "wireless" hookup, RF signals are sent from the controller to the cars & LC's ,eliminating the LED signal reading ???

                  Making the signal transmission more reliable, as the car & LC are not dependent on the "handoff" between a car flashing by, and the embedded sensor ???
                  You're right about the LEDs under cars.

                  Wireless systems such as Scorpius and oXigen still use them, though. The oXigen system is almost identical to SSD, in that there is an LED in the car, and a sensor in the track. oXigen uses another sensor system for lap counting, using magnets and magnetic sensors. Scorpius is similar, but reversed... it uses LEDs in the track, and a sensor in the car. Although it triggers the lane changer wirelessly, it only knows which lane changer to trigger because of the LED in the track that it reads as it is passing by.

                  The signal transmission for car control is wireless from the controller directly to the car, but the lane changing (and lap counting for Scorpius) still rely on LEDs and sensors.

                  The odd men out are Ninco, which uses/d dead strips for lap counting and lane change triggering, and SCXD which used a built in solenoid for lane changing and reed switches for lap counting. the new SCXD (WOS) is another ball of wax, and appears that it might use wireless to the cars for control, IR for lap counting, and the solenoid for lane changing.

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