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Slot.It GT-40 MKII stock tires, C1 compound?

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  • #16
    Try holding the back end of the car in the air, with the front end on the track. Squeeze controller bit by bit, and observe the behaviour/expansion of the tires; even if they're not slipping on the rims, they may be contacting the body.

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    • #17
      Thanks to all that replied for the suggestions.
      After reading jaws post I grabbed some P6 compound tires that I had on hand and threw them on the 956. After about 100 laps there was no movement and the car was running good, but between laps 100 and 120, one tire moved a quarter of the way around the wheel. So all my previous tire testing was a waste of time. jaws, I owe you a beer.
      So now, what is the preferred method of glueing the tires. What glue is everyone using?

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      • #18
        Just throw a set of Super Tires 1404R on your Slot.it. The best tire our there for wood tracks. They will create a lot of build up on the track unlike urethanes. Never worry about dust etc. My track is in garage. Sure it gets all kinds of dust and stuff blowing on to it. But you run a few laps and clean tires using a TyreBuddy . I have a slot beside the track with power and a small flat wet sponge(water). By the time practice is over the track is up to race conditions.

        Temperature changes do not affect them either. We race from almost too hot to be in garage to driving with gloves on and lap times stay about the same.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Black3sr View Post
          Just throw a set of Super Tires 1404R on your Slot.it. The best tire our there for wood tracks. They will create a lot of build up on the track unlike urethanes. Never worry about dust etc. My track is in garage. Sure it gets all kinds of dust and stuff blowing on to it. But you run a few laps and clean tires using a TyreBuddy . I have a slot beside the track with power and a small flat wet sponge(water). By the time practice is over the track is up to race conditions.

          Temperature changes do not affect them either. We race from almost too hot to be in garage to driving with gloves on and lap times stay about the same.
          I appreciate the suggestion but I would really like to stay with mostly rubber tires a few urethanes.

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          • #20
            It is best if you only run the same type of tire on your track, if you must mix tire types rubber and urethane tires play well together. Be aware that poorly formulated rubber tires may turn hard and loose grip or they may rather suddenly turn to goo. On the other hand properly formulated rubber tires can still be good after fifty years.
            Different types of tires require a different cleaning method. I just roll silicone tires on sticky tape. I wash rubber and urethane tires with a dishwashing liquid solution. Last year my club hosted several DaVols Cup races, I noticed that one car that had been a top finisher in the earlier races now had almost no grip. The series used urethane tires, a close examination of the tires on that car indicated that they had become glazed. Since no cleaning solution was available I wiped the tires down with electrical contact cleaner which removed the glaze and restored the grip.
            I am a tester for HO Super Tires and sometimes I have to do both silicone and urethane tires. In that case I run the silicone tires first, since that is what is normally run on my track. When I am done testing the silicone tires the track gets wiped down with naphtha and is conditioned by running a car with urethane tires for many laps. If I simply switched tires without conditioning the track the urethane tires would quickly get coated with silicone residue and would lose much of their grip.
            If your tires are going off you will need to use an effective cleaning method. If the tires are moving on the wheels it would be best to glue them. If you were to use a thick glue it would not be likely that the layer of glue would be uniform, so the mounted tires would not be perfectly true.
            My club has hosted the Group 5 Proxy and that uses rubber tires. If you need good advise on gluing and truing rubber tires you might contact one of the top finishers in that series.
            Last edited by RichD; 02-18-2019, 08:19 AM.

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            • #21
              In our local club we run mostly Slot It rubber N22's and F22's on predominately routed wood tracks with great success. We use these as spec tires on some classes too.

              The key to repeatable track results is gluing and truing the tires on the rims and some maintenance. There is a tire glue for this, IC2000, that some use. Some also have had good results from the clear Gorilla glue.
              Treat the tires with some NSR oil to soften them up a little further. Clean the tires with either lighter fluid or NSR oil on a rag between heats or laps. I also use lint roller tape.

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              • #22
                I also run mostly F22's then N22's on my plastic chassied cars.
                The C1 tires have great straight line traction but move oddly when sliding in the corners.
                I have two or three cars that came with the treaded (not threaded) C1 tires and they seem to work fine, but the full C1 slick is an odd tire.

                My track is about a 50ft. wood with flat paint.

                Mike

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                • #23
                  Just to confuse the issue -- I have a 90ft. Scaley 4-laner. No mags and all cars with added weight and blueprinting. Urathane tires -- and the best GT40's are faster than the 956/962's of the current crop (meaning evo chassis). Because of curvy nature, it may simply that the Ford can transition faster or slide out less than the 956/962's. As to the Porsches, the KH are also usually faster than the LeMans tails...

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                  • #24
                    Well I just ordered a bunch of wheels. (and a newer 962 :-)) I will get some tires glued up and get back to testing.
                    The tires are starting to move on the GT40 also after about 125 laps.
                    Interesting that every time I do a bunch of testing (100 laps or so) with Slot it tires the track is then faster (more grip) for all the other non Slot it cars that run immediately afterwards. That lasts for 100 laps or so and then the times gradually get back to normal.

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                    • #25
                      When you switch from Slot.it tires to tires by another make are those also rubber tires? I do not have any experience with switching between rubber and urethane tires on 1/32nd tracks without conditioning the track for one or the other.
                      With respect to glued tires you have to check those from time to time to be sure that the bond has held up. I have had cars whose handling dropped off and a close inspection of the bond at the sidewalls has indicated that a small area had come unstuck. Most of the time I can add a dab of adhesive in those areas without having to true the tire again. Several years ago I started to have a lot of problems with tires that were glued with Superglue. I switched to a silicone high temperature gasket cement and I have not had that fail, however the stuff is messy to apply. Slot Car Corner sells a device for putting a tire on a wheel that has been coated with that type of adhesive and if you do a lot of tires you might want to look into that. A second problem with using the silicone adhesive would be getting the tire off when it was time for a change. I use silicone tires and those last a very long time, if you are using rubber or urethane tires those will need changing much more often. Possibly the old tire would be badly damaged when you removed it and the wheel would be coated with adhesive and bits of the tire. The stuff that dissolves silicone the best is MIBK (methylisobutylketone). MEK (methylethylketone) is a more common solvent that can be found at many hardware stores and may work nearly as well with an overnight soaking. Don't soak plastic wheels!

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by RichD View Post
                        When you switch from Slot.it tires to tires by another make are those also rubber tires? I do not have any experience with switching between rubber and urethane tires on 1/32nd tracks without conditioning the track for one or the other.
                        With respect to glued tires you have to check those from time to time to be sure that the bond has held up. I have had cars whose handling dropped off and a close inspection of the bond at the sidewalls has indicated that a small area had come unstuck. Most of the time I can add a dab of adhesive in those areas without having to true the tire again. Several years ago I started to have a lot of problems with tires that were glued with Superglue. I switched to a silicone high temperature gasket cement and I have not had that fail, however the stuff is messy to apply. Slot Car Corner sells a device for putting a tire on a wheel that has been coated with that type of adhesive and if you do a lot of tires you might want to look into that. A second problem with using the silicone adhesive would be getting the tire off when it was time for a change. I use silicone tires and those last a very long time, if you are using rubber or urethane tires those will need changing much more often. Possibly the old tire would be badly damaged when you removed it and the wheel would be coated with adhesive and bits of the tire. The stuff that dissolves silicone the best is MIBK (methylisobutylketone). MEK (methylethylketone) is a more common solvent that can be found at many hardware stores and may work nearly as well with an overnight soaking. Don't soak plastic wheels!
                        Yes, when I use the track afterwards that is exclusively with rubber tires of many different manufacturers.
                        They all run a third to a half second faster. This happens every time on every lane.

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