Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Show So Far...2/3/11

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Show So Far...2/3/11

    Here are some progress shots of the master.




    I think the body looks a bit thick... but I don't know. Judging from this photo taken at Laguna Seca it is. However I know motion shots taken tend to look a bit stretched. I'm gonna have to do some thinking...



    Stay Tuned!

    Greenman62

  • #2
    I'm with you, it does look thick...still great work as always!

    What's the car you are modeling?

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice work! It's great to see another car from a very interesting era.

      I recall that part of the body on the 1:1 car came from a metal advertising sign. Maybe that is part of the reason for the "brick like" look.
      Last edited by J. D. Clampett Racing; 02-03-2011, 07:58 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        SShhh, master at work....

        Must have spent 20 minutes looking at that master, I used to do these in basswood for vacuformed bodies and it is an art. Does look a little high on top and based on the shot you have there the line is less curved. The back is coming along very well as is the front. Whatever you do it will come out fine, your models are always great.
        Is that one solid piece of wood? I used to use the various sizes available and glued together to get the basic proportions then carve. I would have it looking perfect only to discover one side was higher or lower than the other till I changed my method. What really throws you off is when you compromise one area for say wheel or chassis considerations the whole thing can look odd if you don't compromise elsewhere. Whatever you ask for the model when it's done really can't begin to pay for the time you put in to make it. I will be in line for at least one.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Biggy View Post
          Must have spent 20 minutes looking at that master, I used to do these in basswood for vacuformed bodies and it is an art. Does look a little high on top and based on the shot you have there the line is less curved.
          Yeah... I think the issue is the upper part was too bowed. I flattened it a bit and it looks much better now.

          Originally posted by Biggy View Post
          Is that one solid piece of wood?
          Yup. It's one piece of bass wood. I'm trying to carve the fenders from a 3 layer lamination of 3/8" basswood. It's kind of working. It maybe too fragile for long life so, I may go with epoxy putty shaping it initially by hand then finishing with files and the Dremel.

          Originally posted by Biggy View Post
          I would have it looking perfect only to discover one side was higher or lower than the other till I changed my method. What really throws you off is when you compromise one area for say wheel or chassis considerations the whole thing can look odd if you don't compromise elsewhere.
          I understand what you'r saying... so far I haven't run into that problem. Keeping everything balanced takes time, careful measuring a good eye

          When I did the Allard I didn't worry about what I was going to put under it until it was done (this was before I started scratch-building chassies from brass). The car has the typical cutout for the driver that many sportscars of the era had so a mid motor chassis woudn't work. Someone on this forum suggested using a modified Scaley Caterham chassis (which I had on hand)... it worked!

          Old Yeller should not present a problem. a PCS 32 chassis should work just fine for those who don't want to fuss... and there maybe enough room in the back for either a sidewinder or anglwinder chassis

          Originally posted by Biggy View Post
          Whatever you ask for the model when it's done really can't begin to pay for the time you put in to make it.
          Well... I didn't do the Allard, Old Yeller or any of my other cars because I wanted to make money... I wanted the cars for my own collection. It's also a matter of problem solving to get what you want... which is a really great part of this hobby for me. If this car works out well, I'll be moving on to another American Special (not sure which). But I'm going to try something really ambitious... the Ferrari 430 Mexico.



          Greenman62
          Last edited by greenman62; 02-05-2011, 12:08 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes, I never did it for the money, really just to have something no one was making....The 430 Mexico would be a neat project. The USRRC cars are virtually an untapped area (my favorite) as well as some of the historic area races. Looking forward to your next update.

            Comment


            • #7
              I found this link at "Professor Motor".

              http://www.tamsoldracecarsite.net/

              The site has numerous "Ol' Yaller" pics.

              (A Buick V-8???)
              Last edited by mad_john; 03-03-2011, 06:14 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by mad_john View Post
                I found this link at "Professor Motor".

                http://www.tamsoldracecarsite.net/

                The site has numerous "Ol' Yaller" pics.

                (A Buick V-8???)
                Yeah... BTDT... `not the best shots to help me. Closeups are better and I've got plenty of them.

                Old Yeller is on temporary hold... I have a proxy car (a Prewar Alfa) to get done and off to Italy.

                At this point the body is less "chubby" and details are going on. I've inlet the grille (`might have to play with that a bit) and have constructed the louvers for the lower body ahead of the the cockpit. Ahead are the fenders and the exhaust. The fenders will be sculpted in epoxy putty, the headers will be most likely made of Copper wire so they will be durable enough for casting.

                More to come,
                Greenman62

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi

                  Mad John, ya the motor is the buick nailhead 401. It was the most powerful domestic motor of the day. As a kid Max Bulkowski and his wife Ina were my heros. Met them a couple times in "hot rodder" circles. The 401 was underrated as a powerplant later. And, of course, the later "small blocks" were a better choice.

                  Fate

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X