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How are the bodies made?

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  • How are the bodies made?

    A few questions if I may?

    What materials are the bodies made from?
    How do they compare in thickness and durability to standard ready to run plastic 1/32 scale body?
    What do you use as the form to vacuum over?

    Thanks.

    Don M

  • #2
    Don, I'm glad you asked.
    What materials are the bodies made from?
    Most of the 1/32 bodies are made from .020" PETG plastic. Some people order them made from a Lexan polycarbonate sheet.

    How do they compare in thickness and durability to standard ready to run plastic 1/32 scale body?
    They are certainly thinner.

    Some would say that a vacuum formed body holds up better. Many claim that PETG is brittle. Lexan is very tuff. I supplied a club race in France recently, 16 Lexan bodies for their yearly 24 hour 1/24 slot car race and after 24 hours of racing they had no bodies fracturing in any way.

    I prefer PETG. Which I believe is very strong when bodies are made from it using the process I use.

    Great for picking up details and undercuts.
    What do you use as the form to vacuum over?
    I mostly use an epoxy mold for forming over. As seen here

    Regards,
    Victor
    Last edited by TrueScale; 02-08-2011, 08:46 PM.

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    • #3
      Victor........ I have said it before and I will say it again............. Best clear bodies I have ever had!!!!!!!!!!

      Joel

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      • #4
        I have used Victor's bodies in both 1/24 and 1/32 scale.............if you are looking to try a clear shell, his are the nicest currently available by far !!

        With regards to Lexan vs. PETG, I have historically been an advocate of Lexan, however, having tried a few of his PETG bodies, I have been impressed with the detail (better than Lexan), and have been equally impressed with the durability.

        cheers
        Chris Walker

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        • #5
          Any plans for NASCAR bodies? These are sah-ha-wheet!

          Comment


          • #6
            I have also used TrueScale's bodies and they are incredible. One of mine (decorated with the music of Linus and Lucy from the Charlie Brown animated specials) was featured in an SCI calendar a few years ago.

            Randy

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            • #7
              Thank you for the comments.

              Lexan vs. PETG?

              I have been meaning to post about this on the TrueScale website.

              We all know that Lexan (polycarbonate) is one of the strongest most durable materials. It is also hard to use to make items using thermoforming/vacuum forming. Unless you know how to use the material.

              Next time you get the chance try to break or crack an empty liter soda bottle. It may not break. those bottles are made from PET.

              PETG is different than PET in that a glycol modifier "G" is added to help prevent brittleness.

              I believe and have experienced it many times, that PETG for slot car bodies is very durable.

              However, using PETG to produce vacuum formed slot car bodies correctly can be a problem and a challenge unless you know some important factors while using it.

              TrueScale Products has always used a special method to produce our PETG bodies in an effort to bring you both sharp details and durable strength. Some older TrueScale made PETG bodies have been known to facture but I can tell you that within the last few years, I have certainly found the proper process for using PETG to make slot car bodies.

              I have always been dedicated to replace any broken or fractured TrueScale body from its customers.
              Victor.
              Last edited by TrueScale; 03-30-2011, 06:17 AM.

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              • #8
                thunderbearr,

                What scale?

                I have thought about NASCAR bodies many times. I have some older NASCAR molds of some 60's 70's cars that are in bad shape and need work.

                I just don't have time to work on them.
                Victor

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by TrueScale View Post
                  Don, I'm glad you asked.

                  Most of the 1/32 bodies are made from .020" PETG plastic. Some people order them made from a Lexan polycarbonate sheet.



                  They are certainly thinner.

                  Some would say that a vacuum formed body holds up better. Many claim that PETG is brittle. Lexan is very tuff. I supplied a club race in France recently, 16 Lexan bodies for their yearly 24 hour 1/24 slot car race and after 24 hours of racing they had no bodies fracturing in any way.

                  I prefer PETG. Which I believe is very strong when bodies are made from it using the process I use.

                  Great for picking up details and undercuts.


                  I mostly use an epoxy mold for forming over. As seen here

                  Regards,
                  Victor
                  is anyone making a E36 M3 BMW body?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi

                    The only problem with PETG is what to call it! Grin. "Petty-peg"? "Pettegg"?

                    We need a better catcher trade name here!

                    Fate

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                    • #11
                      1/32 preferably. But 1/24 would be cool, too.

                      Originally posted by TrueScale View Post
                      thunderbearr,

                      What scale?

                      I have thought about NASCAR bodies many times. I have some older NASCAR molds of some 60's 70's cars that are in bad shape and need work.

                      I just don't have time to work on them.
                      Victor

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hey guys, Victor is being modest. It requires lots of experience and some real trial and terror to know the correct temperature to begin forming and how much to let it cool before pulling from the mold. Too hot, either place, creates problems. Too cool, either place, creates different problems.

                        There is an addendum to Murphy's Law that reads "Nothing is ever as simple as it sounds."

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