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About treating «hard» Rubber Tires

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  • #16
    Active ingredient in most sunscreens is LANOLIN...many household product have it.
    Lip balm, etc.
    Some like WD-40 as an oil for tire cleaning.
    Changing the tires to silicone (or sandable eurethane) will last much longer and only need cleaning.

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    • #17
      Lanolin is also in INOX I think... I read somewhere someone used shoe inlays with lanolin and rubbed he track with it much like Inox... all hearsay at this point..

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ramcatlarry View Post
        Active ingredient in most sunscreens is LANOLIN...many household product have it.
        Lip balm, etc.
        Some like WD-40 as an oil for tire cleaning.
        Changing the tires to silicone (or sandable eurethane) will last much longer and only need cleaning.

        So, I'll just have to go to a d.i.y-market, to buy a tube of silicone paste, the same I use in my bathroom etc., but the black one instead of the white or transparent. Than I put a hub on an axle on my lathe, and start pumping, while turning the hub manually ...


        lots of slots
        Hufo

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        • #19
          Here's my .02 cents.

          It seems like this is always a two questions answered with one. 1. rejuvenating hard rubber tires. 2 Cleaning tires for driving/racing.

          For rejuvenating hard rubber tires:

          If they are too old and hard there's nothing you can do to bring them back. But if not there are several options. Lanolin is something I've heard of a lot but never used. My 2 go tricks are WD-40 and 3 in 1 oil. I've also used STP oil treatment, but with less favorable results. 3n1 has worked best for me. I put one tire in a small plastic bag and fully coat the tire, then tightly seal the bag removing all air. I try to keep the air out and constrict the tire in such a way as it doesn't expand. This ensures that the tire will retain it's former size. I leave it in the baggy for anywhere from 6 to 48 hours, depends on how dried out the tire was. Most rubber tires can be brought back to life this way. I've done this same process with 3n1, WD-40 and STP oil treatment.

          Cleaning:

          This is the bad one. I've learned the hard way that the better it cleans the shorter your tire life. Here's my list of tire cleaners I've used:
          Scaleauto Tire Cleaner
          Alcohol
          Windex
          WD-40
          Spit/Water

          The correlation between traction and tire degradation is almost exact. The SA tire cleaner will give you the fastest 5-10 laps, but those tires will always need that cleaning to perform, and will get hard and become non usable after repeated use. And even if only used once you can almost guarantee those tires will be rock hard in a couple months. Like a previous poster said when you clean tires with chemicals it leaches out the oils and degrades the tires. Water/spit might not do the absolute best job of cleaning pre-race, but you also won't damage tires in any way.

          If using foam I think the Scaleauto tire cleaner has no adverse effects.

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          • #20
            Lanolin is not the ACTIVE ingredient in sunscreen products. The sunscreen may contain TiO2, Octyl methoxycinnamate, or other active sunscreen ingredients. Lanolin is a moisturizer. If you wish to store rubber tires, take a woman's facial primer, like a silicone based primer, and coat your tires lightly with it, until you are ready to use. Then take lighter fluid or pure Naptha and clean off the tires, you will find your tires are preserved beautifully, and then recoat them with a tire treatment. In Southern California, racers in the SCRRA and at Pebblestone use Mill's Magic, V Teck or Barney's solution to treat tires before running 1/32 or 1/24 cars.

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            • #21
              WD-40 is 11% light mineral oil, the oil is what actually conditions rubber tires. The rest of the formulation is mostly a mixture of unspecified solvents. The solvents are likely to degrade rubber in the long run. Years ago we treated our tires with WD-40 and often they fell apart. The tires may have fallen apart if they had not been treated, at this point there is no way of telling.

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              • #22
                For "us" non professional "kids" who play by their own rules on their own track with over 1000 cars of all scales, I can't afford to buy new tires. I read on a post on here one time, if you aren't worried about wearing off the rubber on your track and race with others who don't care, just buy a tube of black permatex silicone at a hardware store. Put a dab on your finger and apply it to the rear tires by turning the other tire or a small screw driver into the hub cap holes. If you want it extra smooth, put saliva on a mirror or piece of glass and turn the tire with wet silictone carefully. You can go to whatever great lengths you want to go to such as cleaning the tires well with dawn or lighter fluid depending on the tire material, solid rubber or foam. Let the permatex cure overnight. It will spin off the tire if you spin tires alot, but for 1000s of cars and I run IROC, it works for me. Sorry I don't remember the exact permatex silicone designation. I know this is not a response for making rubber tires come to life; it is making any rubber tire "work" with decent grip if "rules" are not an issue.

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