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recommended glue for rubber tires to metal wheels please.

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  • recommended glue for rubber tires to metal wheels please.

    Doing a search I can't believe all of the options.
    I guess ease of tire removal and a longer set time is what I would want.
    Any suggestions would be appreciated.
    Thanks, Rich

  • #2
    I have just started to use the Gorilla Clear Glue. It has enough cure time to make it easy to use and not the toxic type smell of the more popular black glue. For foam tires the ever popular 3M trim cement works great.

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    • #3
      Don't use Cyanoacrylate. It may be quick and easy...but...

      Some tires rubber doesn't react, some do...badly
      The one's that react badly, the rubber will be fine for a few weeks, maybe even a couple of months. Then, the rubber will start to get very hard. Starting at the wheel rim, then moving to the tread.

      I've had this happen to several tires. I "think" most of the one's that reacted were NSR, but I know I've had Slot.it react badly also.
      Foam also react's negatively.

      Mike

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      • #4
        Flowable silicone. Always works great with rubber, urethane and silicone tires.

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        • #5
          Thanks Guys.
          With Flowable silicone or Gorilla glue, how do you remove the tires?

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          • #6
            This thread might be useful to you.

            In my experience, IC2000 is great for silicones, but not so sure it's the best thing for rubber tires. Although, oddly enough, flowable black silicone for 1:1 automotive applications seems to work well.

            I've just been hearing about this clear Gorilla glue, no experience using it though. The 'regular' Gorilla glue is an expansion glue, that gets activated by water. Fabulous for ensuring that screws in gate-posts never come loose, can be awful messy in fine applications though.

            With Flowable silicone or Gorilla glue, how do you remove the tires?
            I'd suggest that when you're gluing and truing tires, you take the view that this is going to be 'forever'. If the tires eventually wear out, it will be time to cut/shave/sand them off the rims and chuck 'em.

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            • #7
              Interesting one uses flowable silicone. Is it just the black or can one use the clear? How does it hold up over time keeping the edges secure while cornering?

              We use the clear stuff to make sponge/silicone tires for HO scale TJets.

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              • #8
                Never tried the clear. But the windshield in my Econoline doesn't leak any more ...

                Permatex is a good source for the product, you can Giggle it. There's a lot of useful stuff in your local hardware store.
                Last edited by Wet Coast Racer; 02-16-2019, 09:46 PM.

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                • #9
                  Yes, Permatex is the brand we use in clear. Going to give it a test on my next set of hubs.

                  Thanks.

                  Aren't hardware stores destination fun parks?

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                  • #10
                    I had an problem with a 1/32nd scale car "throwing" thin urethane tires -- due to centrifugal force or cornering loads, or both. This problem cropped up a few days after those tires were installed. Apparently over time the tension holding the tires on the wheels relaxed, allowing them to come loose.

                    I removed the tires, turned them inside-out and coated the inner surface with a thin layer of "Goop" brand glue, then re-inverted the tires and re-installed them on the aluminum wheels.

                    Since then the tires have stayed in place, and the car runs and corners very well.

                    I don't have much experience with "Goop", but as I understand it it is the go-to glue for re-attaching urethane soles onto shoes. I've had success using it for that purpose. So using it as an adhesive for urethane tires, at least, seems to make sense.

                    As for removing glued tires from wheels, I'm not sure that is worth the effort. I have done it, but afterwards I mounted each wheel in my benchtop mill and sanded a few thousandths off the outside diameter, removing the residual glue, exposing fresh metal, and truing up the wheel. That roughened surface probably helped the next set of glued-on tires to get a good grip.

                    Cyanoacrylate glues (superglues) do have the advantage of forming a thinner glue line, and Gorilla brand superglues delayed set-up can be helpful. But as noted above superglues have their own issues.

                    Ed Bianchi
                    Last edited by HO RacePro; 02-17-2019, 07:14 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Paul Gage told me a few years ago to use Sally Hansen Nail Hardner from Walmart and I found it works great. I also use it to coat front tires so they don't grip. It works great!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by s.o.f. View Post
                        Paul Gage told me a few years ago to use Sally Hansen Nail Hardner from Walmart and I found it works great. I also use it to coat front tires so they don't grip. It works great!
                        Yes. This also works very well.

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                        • #13
                          Back in the day (1970's) we used 3M automotive weatherstrip adhesive.

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                          • #14
                            I agree with Jim. I always used 3M high end contact cement not only for slot car tires but also when I raced 1/8th and 1/12th scale nitro powered R/C on-road cars. Anyone remember the Jerobee chassis?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gmcullan View Post
                              I agree with Jim. I always used 3M high end contact cement not only for slot car tires but also when I raced 1/8th and 1/12th scale nitro powered R/C on-road cars. Anyone remember the Jerobee chassis?

                              You mean this?


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