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  • Routing Bits

    I have been looking at router bits to route my track with.
    My local hardware store (U.S.) doesn't have 3mm bits,
    but it does have 1/8" straight HSS bits.
    These are about 3.16 mm.
    Should this be ok to route my track with,
    or will the extra .16mm create an issue with the slot being too wide?

    Also, they seem a bit pricey to me. They want $22 U.S. for one bit.
    Is this a reasonable price or do I need to go online to buy one?

    Tim

  • #2
    1/8 is fine. That's what I used, and the .16mm isn't that big of a deal.
    A good bit can be expensive, so the one you're looking at might be one of the good ones. What kind/brand is it, specifically?

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    • #3
      I am not sure of the brand, but this hardware store is known for carrying decent to good products and not much in the lower line.

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      • #4
        check Home Depot or Lowes

        You want tungsten carbide bits, NOT high speed steel. HSS bits are junk and will overheat and not cut worth a dammm. I buy them for about $13 to $14, and if I catch a sale can get them for a bit less than $10. These are the ones you want.

        TOJ

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        • #5
          I have used FREUD routing bit, very happy with the result.

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          • #6
            1/8" bits are okay. i think i used them to. Or did i use Bosch bit? Sorry, i canīt remember the brand.
            the difference between 3mm and 1/8" is so small that you will not notice a difference while routing, driving or at any time.
            Very important part while routing: use a vacuum cleaner directly attached to your router, otherwise the router bit will get hot soon and the slot will clog up with MDF dust.
            Peter

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            • #7
              Thanks go out to The Old Jaybird. I wasn't sure about the price I had gotten. That $22 price was for a HSS single flute bit. I will definitely keep looking for a better price and a HM bit. My router is a little 1/2 horse trim router and I do not have a vacuum that hooks up to it....I guess the wife will be there with a dust buster lol.

              Now a question about power supplies. I know a lot about a lot of things, but nothing about electricity. I originally thought I needed a variable voltage power supply, but since I am looking at Ardin an Fast Lanes I think I should just go with a 5-6 volts power supply. Considering I will have 4 lanes at about 17 feet per lane, how much amperage should I have? Also, should I use multiple power supplies as opposed to one? Could I get by using 2 of the Artin wall plug in power packs or would that be JUST GETTING BY?

              Comment


              • #8
                How many amps do you need?
                It depends on what sort of motors you run.
                You already seem to have spotted you'll need twice as many amps to run 4 cars rather than 2 at once.
                The lap length doesn't make any difference to how many amps are needed from the power supply. The lap length can make a difference to how muxh wiring is needed.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for responding. I really don't know what my amp need is going to be. It will be a routed 4 lane track, 17 feet per lane with copper tape contact. I am pretty sure all the cars will be Artin or Fast Lanes. I am planning on using Parma economy controllers with 20 ohm resistors unless someone convinces me otherwise. I don't know what else I can tell you to figure out what amp usage I will have. If any one can help me with what my requirements should be I would appreciate it.
                  Tim

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                  • #10
                    Hi Tim
                    Sorry to say I've not got one of those motors to measure.
                    Guess it's a question for the Artin and Fast Lanes specialist.

                    The controller resistance is all about matching the controller to the car, it's pretty much independent of the power supply current limits. Another question for thee Artin and Fast Lanes specialist - they should be able to say what normally works well with theses car.

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                    • #11
                      I think an adjustable voltage PSU will still be useful. In your case, NOT the typical 5-15v kind us 1/32 guys often use, but you'll probably want a 0-10v adjustable one, or similar. You could probably get by with a 5-10 amp model, but you might just find yourself running a lane or two with different sized cars. 4 lanes of 1/43 could easily be run as a 2 lane 1/32 track. ;-)
                      My point is, I believe the PSU is one of the most important parts of a DIY track, and the ability to adjust voltage both up AND down, is very important. You may not need to adjust amps, but it's always better to have more than you need than to have less, IMHO.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks Mr. Flippant. I had not considered the use of 1/32 scale on this track.
                        You are right though, with the spacing I am using it would have plenty room to run as a 2 lane 1/32. Only problem there is the matter of it being such a short track. However, that is an option I need to keep in the back of my mind.

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                        • #13
                          If you rout in your house without a vacuum attachment or other such and you'll need a good divorce lawyer. You'll be cleaning up dust for months afterward. Shop vacs are cheaper than a lawyer and get the drywall dust filter for it too. Wear a good well fitted dust mask and rout it outside if you are able.

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                          • #14
                            Another reason to get a variable voltage PSU is that not all 1/43 cars use the same motors. You might be enjoying Artin and Fast Lane stuff right now, but you might pick up some Carrera GO, SCX Compact, or even some Kyosho Dslot43. Heck, some day you might find yourself building your own cars with who knows what kind of motors. Being able to dial down (or up) the power will be vital to your enjoyment of a wide range of cars, no matter the scale.

                            Oh, and short tracks are fun for 1/32 cars as well. Just look how much fun people had in the SLOP proxy.
                            [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnO4EnnL8mA"]SLOP car on SLOP track - YouTube[/ame]

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                            • #15
                              Caveman

                              Your trim router will do just fine. Doesn't take much HP to cut MDF if you have a good bit. I have a DeWalt that works great.

                              If you can rout outside, an air compressor is just as good as a shop vac. Just clear the slots with a blast of air and blow that nasty MDF dust all over the neighborhood!!!! Seriously....my son and I did this and had MDF covering an area of about 1/2 a basketball court in his yard.

                              TOJ
                              Last edited by The Old Jaybird; 09-23-2014, 01:23 PM.

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