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  • #16
    I used a $22 trim router from Harbor Freight and a Slot Car Corner bit. No problem and then I mailed the bit to a sloter in South Africa who built a second track with it. I think it then got passed on....

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    • #17
      I love the SLOP track!!!
      I will be doing the routing on my deck and I do have an air compressor. I hadn't even thought about the air compressor...thanks. Yes, I will be wearing a mask and so will my wife. I can't believe how excited she is about this! But then, she loved slot cars a long time ago. She just didn't want to compete in races at the commercial track. She will be ..... Let me just say she will be using the compressor for me.
      In another day or two I will start a new thread documenting the building of the track.

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      • #18
        S.O.F., I had other people tell me the harbor freight trim router did fine. That is what I bought. Glad to hear you confirm it will do the job.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by TeamCaveman View Post
          Thanks go out to The Old Jaybird. I wasn't sure about the price I had gotten. That $22 price was for a HSS single flute bit. I will definitely keep looking for a better price and a HM bit. My router is a little 1/2 horse trim router and I do not have a vacuum that hooks up to it....I guess the wife will be there with a dust buster lol.

          Now a question about power supplies. I know a lot about a lot of things, but nothing about electricity. I originally thought I needed a variable voltage power supply, but since I am looking at Ardin an Fast Lanes I think I should just go with a 5-6 volts power supply. Considering I will have 4 lanes at about 17 feet per lane, how much amperage should I have? Also, should I use multiple power supplies as opposed to one? Could I get by using 2 of the Artin wall plug in power packs or would that be JUST GETTING BY?
          SlotCarCorner should be a very good source for the router bit - i would check there!

          Power supply: for a start, you donīt need a fance power supply. 2 amps per lane are really enough. If you only want to run artin cars, even the artin wall warts are enough for a routed track with copper tape. for 17ft of track, you only need one point to feed in the power to the track. If you want to dial down the voltage you can solder a diode rotary switch (also called "speedlimiter"). For less than 10$, it is really good to controll the voltage. Have been using this for years. (hereīs a link to a german site, showing the building of a speedlimiter http://www.carrera4fun.de/3_elektron...edlimiter1.htm) if you want more info, just let me know.
          If you want to use artin cars and go!cars, just use 2 different power supplies, which you plug in just when you need them.

          Peter

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          • #20
            Thanks Peter. I have actually been thinking about this direction. I didn't know if it was called a rheostat or Dial resistor or what, but I was thinking about this. My idea was to get a power supply of about 10 volts, hook up a resistor of some kind that could be adjusted, then plug in a volt meter to set it where I want it. I appreciate the link you sent although I am not an internationalist and am restricted to only knowing english. I get the idea though and with some help from friends I think I can make it work

            In other news, I have now secured my computer for use as a lap timer. I will research all that comes with that a little later. I have also found some carbide HM single flute router bits at a decent price and have ordered two of them.

            Every thing is starting to come together for the build.

            Tim

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            • #21
              A resistor is cutting down the amps as well as the volts. Diodes only cut the volts, 0.7 volts per piece. Of course, the rheostat will work, too.

              EDIT:
              finally found the right link - to philippe's great 1/43rd site http://www.philippejmarchand.com/Slo...58/page58.html
              Last edited by pfuetze; 09-24-2014, 11:41 AM.

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              • #22
                I meant to add that SCC also has the special router bit for cutting the recess that accommodates braid.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by pfuetze View Post
                  A resistor is cutting down the amps as well as the volts. Diodes only cut the volts, 0.7 volts per piece. Of course, the rheostat will work, too.
                  Diodes and resistors slow the cars in a slightly different ways. Without going into all the technical details, the simple way of looking at it is
                  Diodes give a greater reduction in top speed more for the same reduction in acceleration.
                  Resistors give a greater reduction in acceleration for the same reduction in top speed.

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                  • #24
                    Peter, that is an incredible article on reducing power. Thanks, even a guy like me can understand that. However, according to what I think I learned, diodes are not exact so if I had two power sources the 2 lanes from power source 1 could theoretically be faster than the 2 lanes from power source 2 using identical set ups. Or am I spitting hairs about something that would never be noticed? It seems as though I should be able to buy a couple power packs on ebay and have a much cheaper power source than the dreaded $150 variable voltage power supply. Any suggestions as to which power packs would NOT be suitable.
                    Al thanks for clearing up what resistors versus diodes do. I never knew that.
                    s.o.f. thanks for the heads up, I plan to use copper though. Maybe next track I can try braid when I have more confidence in what I am doing.

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                    • #25
                      i used one speedlimiter per lane with artin wall warts and go!wall warts. worked great, never noticed a difference between the power supplies.
                      power pack? for cheap and powerfull power supplies search the bay for "digital 132 trafo". in germany they pop up for less than 10$. 14.8V with 3.5A more than enough. but if you only want to run artin cars, every wall wart with 12V and 2A will be more really, really enough, even maybe too much. start with the stock wall warts - 7.5V are enough!

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by TeamCaveman View Post
                        However, according to what I think I learned, diodes are not exact so if I had two power sources the 2 lanes from power source 1 could theoretically be faster than the 2 lanes from power source 2 using identical set ups.
                        In practice, if you use the same type of diode (and better still buy them all at once) the variation between lanes caused by the diodes is usually too small to matter. (It is possible to get the wrong impression about the variation between diodes from that article.) It's worth mentioning that things like production tolerances in wallwarts and the differences between the corners on different lanes can make more difference to lap times than differences between diodes.

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                        • #27
                          Al, I agree with you about the variances. There can be variances all over the place. I guess it is not anything to worry about especially since this track is for fun and not serious competition. If we ever do form a club (which I would like very much) then we could resolve any differences by lane rotations.

                          I have sen Pfuetze and Al's slotracing a message with questions about this but maybe someone else would have a view point or a warning statement!!! What about using a small 12 volt battery from a lawn mower or a motorcycle and reduce the voltage with diodes? Use this as a single power source providing power to four lanes. Would this be way too many amps and fry the cars?

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                          • #28
                            amps are your friend!!

                            A slot car motor will only draw the amps it needs to operate. So you can't "fry" a motor with too many amps. I used to race at a commercial track that was 8 lanes with a semi-truck battery on each lane with about 800 amps per lane!!!! We were running little Parma Death Stars that drew about 5 amps at most....talk about overkill. I do know that you can start with a 12 volt battery and cut the voltage with diodes/resistors to get where you want. The only problem is that batteries require charging and that can be problematic when indoors. There was a guy on here a few years ago that used batteries and then had a solar panel that charged them. Also, if you run the charger when the track is on, and the charger is "dirty" you can get some nasty current into the system, some AC trickle thru the charge cycle that is not good for DC motors. Better to charge, then run pure DC off the battery alone when racing. Commercial tracks that are "12 volts", but run with the charger on, typically are running 13.8 volts at the track.

                            TOJ

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                            • #29
                              Thanks Jaybird. I remember racing on tracks that had batteries and the owner would let the batteries be on the charger when we raced sometimes. None of us liked it. The current didn't seem consistent. My thoughts are, charge between sessions and run with the charger disconnected. As much as I like to work on stuff, my running time will probably be significantly less than pit time. I don't think I would have a problem with running the charge down.
                              Tim

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by TeamCaveman View Post
                                I remember racing on tracks that had batteries and the owner would let the batteries be on the charger when we raced sometimes. None of us liked it. The current didn't seem consistent.
                                Some battery powered tracks were like that, however many had the battery continually on charge and didn't have any problem with consistency.
                                Why were some a problem and some fine?
                                Back in the day when battery power tracks were much more common, there were lots of examples to examine and figure out what the problem was.
                                The main causes of "current didn't seem consistent" problems were batteries in poor condition, and poorly controlled charging systems with too many volts and a lot of amps. Even when the batteries started out in good condition, they were soon degrading by over charging with too many volts and a lot of amps. By poor condition, I mean damaged, not simply discharged.
                                The tracks with properly controlled charging systems and decent batteries didn't give a problem.

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