Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Digital Wood Track - Lane Changers

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Digital Wood Track - Lane Changers

    I wanted to see if there is anyone out there that has made his own lane switchers. I am about to start the routing, and have a large 4 lane wood track 130' lanes, and am looking at about 20 lane switches, including the pit lane. I am laying in magnetic braid which I already ordered.
    I am trying to see if there is a fairly inexpensive way. I have seen the units that Scorpio sells.
    But what parts are you guys using, solenoid, photo led, and then what electronics do you need to incorporate it.
    Also interested which system people went with for routed wood tracks.

  • #2
    Interesting question, it is possible to make the SCXD system lane changers for routed tracks without extra costs. With different depths in the lane change it is possible to make/forces the car changes the lane.

    This looks the cheapest way to make the lane changes.

    Toni

    Comment


    • #3
      I do want to stay with the traditional guide arm in the slot to switch lanes. I am not a fan of the SCXD way of changing lanes. And I am setup for 1/24th also.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'd recommend the best way to approach your problem is to decide what digital system you think you will like best. They all have different feature sets and different implementations. Not to mention different costs. Each will also require you to use their electronics for the lane changers. The ease of adapting the lane change mechanism for wood may be a (big) part of your decision as to which system you want to use...
        Last edited by b.yingling; 04-25-2012, 08:22 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          The most obvious way to add digital to a routed track is to cut out spaces for whole LC track pieces and drop them into your layout. However, that is easier when planning a track from scratch, when you can make sure the width between slots matches up at the entrance to each LC.

          To mate LCs into an existing track, one of the easiest ways is to open up plastic LCs and scavenge the necessary parts to build your custom LCs. The lane-changing slot can be whatever shape or dimension you like - only the LED sensor (or dead strip if N-Digital), LC electronics and flipper need to be installed from the factory LC. It is also possible to cut away the track piece and keep just enough of the plastic around the flipper and sensor to make it work as original. Cut a hole in the wood track big enough to drop in this cut-down LC, and use Bondo to mate the plastic to the wood track surface. Touch up the paint, and you're done.

          Here's one way to do it: http://youtu.be/bHz6o12spMY

          Of course, you'll also need to drop in the control unit/power base at your S/F line, or at least drop in the sensors and wiring at the correct spot. It's a bit awkward to make four lanes work - especially for Carrera and SSD.

          Have you considered making a hybrid track? With four lanes of digital, there won't be many times when a car gets stuck behind another and is forced to find a way around. That is what adds realism to digital racing, as most 1:1 tracks only have a few good places to pass. You could install digital bits on two lanes (perhaps the middle two) and the switching necessary to allow analog or digital operation. In analog mode you could use four lanes, and in digital mode use only two, which forces the issue of passing. It would also save you money and work.

          Please keep us updated on your progress and post pix as you go!

          Phil
          Last edited by DrumPhil; 04-25-2012, 09:15 AM. Reason: added sample video

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by DrumPhil View Post
            The most obvious way to add digital to a routed track is to cut out spaces for whole LC track pieces and drop them into your layout. However, that is easier when planning a track from scratch, when you can make sure the width between slots matches up at the entrance to each LC.
            If you going to go about it this way, Carrera is probably your only option if you want to run 1/24.

            - Cam

            Comment


            • #7
              Here is my thread that inludes pics of what I am doing

              http://www.slotcarillustrated.com/po...ad.php?t=60310

              I want to be able to run up to 12 cars or so in the future maybe even the full 20, thats why I build such a large track, to have the room for that many cars, and people to stand around it. So far I am looking at the Scorpio and the Slot.it system, which seem to be very similar to each other and can both handle at least 20 cars.
              I will probably start with just analogue for now, but need to route the switch tracks before I lay any kind of braid. Even if I don`t do the full digital electronics yet, I have to decide that part of it.
              I thought about cutting out the flipper out of 6mm aluminum sheeting.

              Christian

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by newimaging View Post
                I want to be able to run up to 12 cars or so in the future maybe even the full 20, thats why I build such a large track, to have the room for that many cars, and people to stand around it. So far I am looking at the Scorpio and the Slot.it system, which seem to be very similar to each other and can both handle at least 20 cars.
                I will probably start with just analogue for now, but need to route the switch tracks before I lay any kind of braid. Even if I don`t do the full digital electronics yet, I have to decide that part of it.
                If you want more than (8) cars, you pretty much have to go Scorpius or oXigen. Decide which you will use and the decision about what electronics to use is made for you. Then you can research what other users of the chosen system are doing in terms of routed track flippers, solenoids etc.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well, first off, I would strongly suggest that lane changes be set up to be at the END of straights, whenever possible, and NOT at the beginning of them. This is because the high end systems (Scorpius and oXigen) both use IR beacons to trigger lane changers, which must be lined up with sensors on the other side of the equation. That means that the cars SHOULD not be sliding at all when crossing the sensors. Putting lane changers right after turns increases the likelihood of that happening, and therefore missing the sensors and the lane change.

                  Since you're routing, you can put long lane changes in the middle of a long straight, so a couple in the longest straight you have couldn't hurt, either.

                  The layout itself looks good, though.

                  And I agree with Bruce. Pick your preferred system, and go with that, then deal with the requirements of that system. In your situation, assuming price is not a big concern, I would probably recommend Scorpius. The even sell pre-assembled flippers in a variety of shapes and sizes. oXigen has many of it's own advantages, but is not yet ideal for routed tracks.
                  Last edited by MrFlippant; 04-25-2012, 09:37 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Christian:

                    I would opt for oXigen, myself, since I see Slot-It as being in it for the long haul, and Maurizio seems to have the ability and desire to respond quickly to customer needs. Additionally, he's worked with Scalextric to ensure that both systems are compatible with each other's chips, so he's allied himself with the longest-lasting slot car company, which is likely to be significant as digital matures. I think there's a tutorial somewhere on the web about somebody who installed Slot-It changers on a routed track. I'll see if I can find it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      For a good description of the differences between Scorpius and oXigen, search this forum and the web.
                      Last edited by MrFlippant; 04-26-2012, 12:58 PM. Reason: Link to outside forum's content not allowed.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What kind of solenoids are you guys using when you build your own lane switchers. I will just cut out switchers out of 6mm aluminum sheet and mount them. Seems easier and cheaper then buying Digital plastic track and cutting it up.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by newimaging View Post
                          What kind of solenoids are you guys using when you build your own lane switchers. I will just cut out switchers out of 6mm aluminum sheet and mount them. Seems easier and cheaper then buying Digital plastic track and cutting it up.
                          If you go Scorpius or oXigen, then this will likely be your route, as there is no plastic track to buy. If you opt to use SSD, D1XX, N-Digital, or SCX-D, then you will have to buy the plastic track anyway in order to acquire the lane change electronics.

                          It is against the rules at SCI to provide links to other sites, but I will mention that there are dedicated discussion groups for Scorpius and oXigen in other locations.

                          Digital slots on the level you are describing are a long term, expensive commitment. If I were just starting out and already knew I planned on going as big as you are planning- I'd take full advantage of the WWW as a research tool and learn a great deal more about digital slots before making any purchases. In fact, if I were just starting out and knew even some of what I've learned along the way, I'd likely spend months reading and listening before buying anything.

                          Cars can (generally) easily be converted from one system to another- but each conversion does carry a cost. A track as large as the one you describe would be expensive to convert from one system to another. So you will likely keep whatever system you finally choose.
                          Last edited by b.yingling; 04-28-2012, 09:59 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Digital Flipper design

                            Here is what I build real quick today out of some aluminum to test out.
                            I`ll have the flipper touch the braid on the side to get current flowing through it depending which side it is on. I have to do some more research, but I assume that the LED in the car gets lit when you push the lane change button in the controller. So then I can mount my own photoLED in the track that picks up the car once it passes and then activates the solenoid.

                            Anyways, this is the $5 solution I came up with so far. More to figure out



                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It's recommended that the tip of the flipper rests in a notch in the slot, that way a guide can NOT accidentally hit the tip and stop hard. It happens, but with plastic track there is a little bulge in the rail in the slot to help deflect guides from the tip of the flipper. You can't really do that, but you can cut the slot just a little wider for the flipper to rest in a notch on either side. This might also make it easier to have the flipper touch the braid, which is usually set back from the slot a small amount to prevent guides from abraiding the inside edge of the braid and causing it to fail. You should definitely update your experiment with those ideas, as well as the rebate for the braid to set into. Other than that, the flipper looks great!

                              As for making your own electronics, it's not quite that easy, especially if you want to use the advanced features. For example, oXigen has a selective lane change system that lets you choose to "move to the outside" or "move to the inside" rather than just change lanes regardless of where it takes you.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X