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  • #16
    FYI, AFX has the same issue. You would not believe how much it costs to license logos, etc. for certain race cars. Folks want "real" liveries, but probably don't want to pay an extra $8-12 per car to get them! It gets pretty ridiculous at times. And that is on top of the fees paid to the car manufacturer to sell a chevy, ford or ...

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    • #17
      Years ago I worked for Olin Corporation and they owned the Winchester gun business. Merchandise with the Winchester logo was very popular and the company had a lawyer whose only job was to handle licencing agreements. The lawyer got samples of all of the items, his office was full of pocket knives, pewter mugs, belt buckles, statues, posters, calendars, etc. Copyrights and trademarks are valuable property, Olin sold the gun business, but they retained the trademarks. US Repeating Arms and later Herstal continued to make the guns, but I presume that Olin still makes money from licensing deals. It would be nice if a company charged a reasonable fee for using their trademarks, etc. considering that the are actually getting free advertising.

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      • #18
        Rich hit the nail on the head. I thought to myself how much is free advertising worth?

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        • #19
          Brands are extremely valuable and companies spend years and billions to build that brand and thus they are extremely protective of it.

          For example you can understand why Mercedes does not want the 3 pointed star plastered on a cheap and inferior product - toy or not. This could change the public's perception of the brand. They don't want the star to have the wrong dimensions and/or shape/colour. All these things add to the right brand image and ensuring that buyers are left with the perception of quality etc. The lettering needs to have the right font and the right spacing and size, this all ads to the name being instantly associated with that particular German car manufacturer.

          Coca Cola wants to ensure that their brand is not used in a way that goes against their family friendly image and that the red colour and logo etc is all used as per their brand guidelines.

          Some people pay $15 for their Kirkland Signature jeans from Costco, others pay $3000 for their Gucci jeans, and both are made from good quality denim. The difference is in the brand and the buyers perception of the value of that brand.

          What's the difference between a Rolex and a Timex, both does a pretty good job of telling the time. (you get my drift)

          Brands are intertwined with many things, from the actual quality of the product to the type of coffee that is served in the showroom. In my world we talk about the "sizzle" and the "steak" the two are are very distinct but also very much linked. The one builds the other.

          Remember that slot cars are not just sold to enthusiast and collectors, but they are very much a toy that is also sold and marketed to kids. Companies are super scared that their brand might be associated with a product that is found to be unsafe or harmful to a child.

          This is a subject that I find personally very interesting, and although I somewhat deviated from the original comment(s) - the point I am trying to make is that brands are very valuable and complex and that companies and their brand police are super protective of it. Slot cars are just a tiny spec in this much, much larger picture and unfortunately our favourite hobby is sometimes caught up in this complex world.

          Here are a few brands and their values - as per Forbes 2017. (this is number 16, 17...) can you guess who is number one, two and three?

          Last edited by F1Fan; 06-21-2017, 10:32 PM.

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          • #20
            F1 fan: I can completely agree with your assessment of the companies wanting to control their brand and make sure it is not degraded. Guess I wonder why if they approve of some object using their brand why do they want so much money for that privilege? Seems a bit counter productive. Lower licensing costs would mean more exposure in my opinion as long as the company owning the brand approves the use on the object. Thanks for your clear thoughts on this subject.

            Charlie

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            • #21
              Originally posted by F1Fan View Post
              (this is number 16, 17...) can you guess who is number one, two and three?
              Apple, Google and Microsoft...

              Remember some of the Revell-Monogram CanAm cars that had no Goodyear decals? Same issue as this - licensing costs.

              Makes one wonder how much Carrera paid for their exclusive Ferrari license, and whether it was worth it.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by gascarnut View Post
                Apple, Google and Microsoft...

                Remember some of the Revell-Monogram CanAm cars that had no Goodyear decals? Same issue as this - licensing costs.

                Makes one wonder how much Carrera paid for their exclusive Ferrari license, and whether it was worth it.
                I don't have the real cost, but I have been told it was in the millions! Can't imagine they will ever recoup that cost.

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                • #23
                  Companies are forced to defend their copyrights whenever they find they have been infringed. If they don't, they may not be able to defend them when it matters.

                  There are knock-off artists all over the world trying to poach recognized brand names and logos. And there are also folks who innocently 'invent' brand names that have already been taken.

                  Given the staggering number of products being sold these days, a recognized brand name or logo is a very valuable thing. Companies invest a lot of time and talent trying to come up with new ones. You can't blame them for defending them aggressively.

                  That said, it does sadden me that you can no longer buy ribbons of authentic racing ads to post around your track. But a scanner and printer can work wonders...

                  Ed Bianchi

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                  • #24


                    I dont allow their "precious" on my cars.

                    I stick with fire ...

                    ... and the wheel.

                    Yet to be copyrighted.
                    Last edited by model murdering; 06-23-2017, 03:05 PM.

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