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  • Mike_dy
    started a topic Ho tyre gauge

    Ho tyre gauge

    HI Guys,
    Getting back into the hobby after nearly 20 years away, see some familiar names still around.
    I'm looking for a tyre gauge like that made by BSRT or Redline. Anyone know where I could purchase one for delivery to Australia?
    Things seem to have changed a bit since I last bought cars and parts over from the US.
    Cheers
    Mike

  • Mike_dy
    replied
    Thanks for all the input, I do have calipers and micrometers already,
    Got a gauge coming now too and a few other options for suppliers too.
    Great to see the hobby still alive and guys still investing in it.
    Cheers,
    Mike

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  • RichD
    replied
    You might tell us exactly how you do a pickup test. I would guess that if the calipers pick up the tire the indicated size is actually too small. In that case the tire might be turned somewhat in the jaws of the caliper so that could be in error. If the tire is not held by the caliper the reading must be too big and you would need to close up the jaws a little more.
    If you have a tire gauge that reads in increments of 0.002 inch I have found that you can tell if the tire is 0.001 under.
    Since I am a tire tester I have had occasion to measure a considerable number of tires and I have actually compared both methods and found that both can give accurate results if you are careful. No matter what you do that last 0.001 inch is going to be in doubt.
    I also have a NIST certified micrometer, I had not thought to take any tire measurements with that.

    Leave a comment:


  • NicoRosberg.
    replied
    The pick-up test removes the need for ''feel''.

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  • Maddman
    replied
    You have to develop a "feel" when using either a gauge, caliper or dial micrometer. This is especially true of sponge or silicone on sponge tires. A dial micrometer was my go to choice back in the day when we ground our own tires at the race. These days I use either a digital caliper or my BSRT tire gauge to verify the diameter on the package as the tires are for the most part made by a vendor. An 0.002" resolution should be acceptable for most racing.


    A dial micrometer.

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  • NicoRosberg.
    replied
    Gauges by definition cannot measure every size.

    Originally posted by RichD View Post
    Most of the time you would want to measure a mounted diameter.
    Totally.

    Originally posted by RichD View Post
    If you like to use calipers you have to be careful because the tires can compress, especially if they are not on a wheel
    Hence the pick-up test.

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  • RichD
    replied
    Scale Auto/BSRT still sells a tire gauge. RJ Jets also has a gauge, but it is only for Fray sizes. I have a Wizzard stainless steel gauge, which is no longer offered. I prefer to use a gauge if it has the right sizes. I start with a hole that is too big and work my way down in diameter until the tire is starting to be a force fit, the preceding size would be the correct one. If you like to use calipers you have to be careful because the tires can compress, especially if they are not on a wheel. Most of the time you would want to measure a mounted diameter.
    Possibly a particular gauge may not be accurate. Gauges made of plastic can change in dimensions with changes in temperature and humidity. Metal gauges at least are immune to changes in humidity. Aluminum has a greater coefficient of thermal expansion than stainless steel, so the latter might be a better choice. A really obsessed person might use a set of pin gauges to check his tire gauge.
    Last edited by RichD; 09-21-2017, 05:30 AM.

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  • slotking
    replied
    when using the calipers, people tend to check just where they grab.
    The gauge: 1 shows you if the tire is round, 2 shows you high spots on the tires, and 3 is a bit more consistent in feel than the caliper.

    but to each his own

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  • galerdude
    replied
    Originally posted by NicoRosberg. View Post
    The tire gauges are too hit-and-miss. Use calipers instead and develop a reliable and repeatable 'pick-up' method.
    I know nothing of the "hit-and-miss" but I have one of the BSRT Tire Gauges on my bench but always seem to grab the digital calipers to measure with. Just seems easier to me, YMMV.

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  • NicoRosberg.
    replied
    The tire gauges are too hit-and-miss. Use calipers instead and develop a reliable and repeatable 'pick-up' method.

    Leave a comment:


  • caveman
    replied
    Check with Dan at VIPER. I think he still makes them.

    Leave a comment:

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