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  • #46
    Bob - I didn't realize you were so close! I really enjoy your decals. Working on an MEV birdcage Maserati right now, will post some pics soon. The group you referenced is probably a 1/32 group, correct? I own 3 1/32 cars, 2 came with my Carrera set, the other a Revell stocker. I like them but I'm going to stick with HO for the foreseeable future. I did race a couple races with another 1/32 club last years with borrowed equipment, did OK, it was fun, may do it again. 1:1 vintage racing is taking up most of my time (and $$) right now, want to do that while I'm still able to. The real race car is in good shape for next season so I can spend most of my free time this winter rebuilding my HO layout.

    Brian

    MEV Maserati thread: http://slotcarillustrated.com/portal...d.php?t=100425
    Last edited by xltjet; 01-29-2019, 11:04 AM.

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    • #47
      I'd love to have a large track to race on.

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      • #48
        Been to many races in public spaces. Brought my track to a local fire house in town center for a few races over the years. My tracks have been to the Nats 500 miles round trip. I've done this to share what I like with my friends. I'm still up for building with transporting in mind. Like ED said "Put handles on it."
        If you build it, your friends will come over.

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        • #49
          "BIG" Slot Car Tracks in HO Scale

          This is a fascinating topic, and have been following for some time the posts on the huge tracks in the U.K., as well as tracks here in the U.S. I looked over this thread, but have not seen anything that defines what is a "Big" track from a "Large" or even HUGE" track.....

          Obviously, the length of a lap is one defining characteristic; the overall square footage the track occupies would be another. Does the number of lanes count as well? What would all of you consider in your definitions?

          Since childhood, I have progressed from simple floor layouts to a 4 x 8 table, to a Ping-Pong table, to adding a conference table, and finally the addition of a circular table, which left my four-lane layout with a lap length of 89'. I thought (in my medium sized basement), that was a decent-sized (with all my structures) layout, UNTIL I got to run on Gary Fast's 119' layout on custom-built long & wide tables. When you have to have "grabbers" to retrieve a car from the infield (or Gary himself climb ON the layout to do some "fine tuning", you have what I consider a "large layout.......


          While I ran on some fairly big commercial tracks as a kid when I was into 1/24 scale, for HO scale, Gary's has been the biggest. It certainly changes your perspective when on a smaller track; I have seen drivers standing on "risers" in some of the U.K. pictures, in order to get a better perspective; even though I am nearly 6'5", I can see where an even higher viewpoint would help.


          If the opportunity ever presents itself to try out a truly huge layout, I would of course take the opportunity. meanwhile, in the future, I am hoping to convert my loft into my next track. How big will it be, I don't know. But, it will be four lane, it will have structures liberally sprinkled throughout, and it will be challenging and fun, just as my last "Aurora Speedway" was........
          Last edited by Speedhoppy; 02-02-2019, 07:59 AM. Reason: Sentence structure fix

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          • #50
            I'd stick my neck out and say footprint - square footage.

            You could cram an 80-110' lap on a 14x6 table, or spread it out in a 40x30 room

            Being able to spread out and make maximum use of a space?

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            • #51
              Big Radii gives Dimension

              Top Down: Being able to spread out and make maximum use of a space?

              I agree Doug. "Space" is the controlling element. The ability to freely design and incorporate usable flow makes a huge difference in the personality of a circuit. Big track means never having to compromise the on the corner designs, so that the exit radii are ascending, at a minimum. Long straights are just long straights. It's the connective tissue in between that makes or breaks the fun factor.

              This allows for some serious "on-throttle" battling when transitioning onto longer chutes; rather than ill conceived fish traps which increase the "offs" and over work the marshals, because cars are always assoverteakettle at the apex instead of high tailing out the exit without incident.

              The "X" is just as important as the "Y".

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              • #52
                Another thing that temporary big tracks add is that its more than likely no one, even the builder, has ever driven on that particular circuit, and everyone has to learn the timing of the track from square one. Its a great equalizer compared to racing on circuits that some folks may have a lot time on.

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                • #53
                  True.

                  Apart from one particular favourite, our July 4th Triple Header, I tried to ensure each track where we were expecting visitors - weekend meetings - was unique, so no home advantage.

                  The Triple Header was a small track, by the way.
                  Last edited by Top Down; 02-03-2019, 08:30 AM.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by model murdering View Post
                    The ability to freely design and incorporate usable flow makes a huge difference in the personality of a circuit. Big track means never having to compromise the on the corner designs, so that the exit radii are ascending, at a minimum. Long straights are just long straights. It's the connective tissue in between that makes or breaks the fun factor.

                    This allows for some serious "on-throttle" battling when transitioning onto longer chutes; rather than ill conceived fish traps which increase the "offs" and over work the marshals, because cars are always assoverteakettle at the apex instead of high tailing out the exit without incident.

                    The "X" is just as important as the "Y".
                    While the connective tissue between the straights is extremely important for the flow of a layout, that can be said about any track. Long straights are more than just long straights. They are a huge part of the appeal of big tracks. Its what makes them open, its what makes them fast. Its one of the main features that separate big tracks from table tracks, if not THE main feature. The long straight on a table track is a short straight on a big track. While a big track can duplicate any feature of a table track, a table track will never duplicate a big track long straight.

                    Your second paragraph is spot on. If the connective tissue is well designed, big tracks allow for some very serious "on-throttle" wheel to wheel battles. Even better, you can easily SEE those battles since the course is wide open and not constantly turning in on itself.

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                    • #55
                      Agreed.

                      It's the mixture - and balance - of long, intermediate and short straights connected by the technical sections AND open nature of a big track that makes it different.

                      What's great IS being able to follow the cars, see where your opponent makes up time and see where you can make it up again, then follow and see the gap changing lap after lap over the course of the heat.

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                      • #56
                        I can't pick up the same info' on a 'hairpin' layout. It just seems like me against the track, the fact that three other people are on at the same time is incidental.
                        Last edited by Top Down; 02-07-2019, 03:23 AM.

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                        • #57
                          I like the term "hairpin layout" as opposed to "table track". Much more descriptive.

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                          • #58
                            Actually should have been 'paperclip' - but hairpin will do just as well - or should it be 'bobbypin' in American English?
                            Last edited by Top Down; 02-07-2019, 06:13 AM.

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                            • #59
                              As far as being able to see more, I guess you can pick up more useful information from your peripheral vision on a bigger and more open track. Drivers tend to focus entirely on their car on a hairpin track because if they loose focus for a split second, they can have an off. While focus is extremely important on a big track as well, you do get more opportunities to make a quick scan of the immediate competition.

                              Paperclip, hairpin, bobbypin, its all the same here.

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                              • #60
                                Drivers tend to focus entirely on their car on a hairpin track because if they loose focus for a split second, they can have an off. While ... on a big track ... you do get more opportunities to make a quick scan of the immediate competition.
                                Exactly my point

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