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Tyco 440x2 set up questions

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  • #16
    Gareth, did you beat those guys yet?

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    • #17
      One of the best superstock Tycos that I had used stock Tyco springs. I increased the preload by inserting an aluminum spacer into the brush tube so that when fully compressed the edge of the brush was flush with the edge of the tube. That car went undefeated for at least two years. Its claim to fame compared to cars which used heavier springs is heat management (the motor stayed cool and it didn't slow down after a few minutes of running). I agree with the double shoe springs. You have to take a lot out of them to get the front end to stay down. Also consider bending the front of the shoe to limit pickup travel.

      Unfortunately that car did not run against an SG+ as they hadn't come out yet. It was killer against other Tycos.
      Last edited by Maddman; 03-20-2019, 06:51 AM.

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      • #18
        Hey up. Sorry for the lack of updates. Busy time with work and family.

        No progress yet I'm afraid. We only race each class every three months so I've got bags of time to implement your suggestions. First week of June will be F1 time again.

        Thanks to everyone for the tips and tricks. Will be working on the cars in the next few weeks and will share my results.

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        • #19
          Duplicated post. Sorry.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Gareth View Post
            Chassis wear can only be by natural means but I'm toying with the idea of running a car on progressively lower wheels for a few thousand laps to channel the chassis. I've just done the same thing with a Micro Scalextric but that suffers from horrendous oversteer.
            Topic: In regards to making the rail wear marks in a chassis here's an old school (very old) tip.

            I haven't found a photo of the old tool I made back in the 80's and have given the tool away long ago. I took a flat piece of solid wood and made three grooves in it. The middle groove emulated the guide pin groove. The two outer grooves wide enough to accept small tri-angle files. flat side down in the groove with the triangle tip facing straight up. The files were spaced to emulate the track rails. I glued the files in-place. When building a fresh chassis, I would put in the guide pin and the rear axle with sponge tires so the chassis would compress as I pushed down on it. I also installed the rear traction magnets which in the X2 ran fairly flush to the bottom of the chassis. I would run the chassis back and forth creating small grooves in the bottom of the chassis and magnets. I would only have to make a few passes. It worked for both the narrow and pan chassis. Then after putting the chassis fully together, I let the track rails finish off the process. I would do this to 2-4 chassis and kept them as extras in case the chassis broke. Then repeated the process when more chassis were needed. If you don't get too aggressive, this mod was virtually undetectable.The chassis wear passed tech every single time. This made short work of "wearing in" the grooves in the bottom of a Tyco 440-x2 chassis.

            Gar
            .

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            • #21
              Nice idea Fastlap. I once made a piece of track that did the same thing. I cut saw teeth into the rails with a Dremel. Make a Figure 8 track with one or two of these saw track sections and run the car really low. You will quickly groove the chassis naturally.
              Last edited by Maddman; 03-20-2019, 12:41 PM.

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              • #22
                Similar ideas for sure . My 1st endeavor was with a 9" section of track that I would take the new chassis with very short tires and rub it back and forth over the rails while pushing down firmly. All kind of the same ideas to get to the desired outcome.

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                • #23
                  Fun topic so far. as the 440x2 was all I ran in the old days.

                  Don't want to derail (pun intended) the discussion, but guess which favorite mate of ours (hint- he gets banned often and his opinion is the only one that counts) tracked me down on FB to tell me that what I did is/was pure cheating. Duh!! of course it was. I remember in the early 80's when we raced a form of Super Stock and we were all using the 440 x2. One rule stated that we had to use stock brush springs and brushes. No aftermarket allowed!!!!!! Anyhow, one lad came up with the idea of inter-winding two STOCK brush springs per side to create a firmer brush spring. He was following the rules. There are racing decades of motorsport engineers that would argue that it wasn't cheating....he was just interpreting the rules in an abstract way.

                  Anyhow, don't listen to my verbal drivel cuz I admit I'm a cheater. Or clever? Nevermind.....


                  .

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                  • #24
                    Hehe, I must admit I rather like your rapid method of wearing the chassis grooves in but seeing as our esteemed club chairman frequents these pages, I shall persist with the oval and the lower height tyres!

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                    • #25
                      Creative rule interpretation is an art-form in itself. F1, ACO and most motorsports organizers fight this battle daily. Funny its not considered cheating there. Me thinks that someone protests too much.

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                      • #26
                        First off, the polarization of the traction magnets is on the Z axis, 90 degrees to the ground plane. So there is no "front" or "rear" face of any traction magnets, just top and bottom, positive and negative. Same with motor magnets... they're polarized through the center, facing the armature, and front and back don't matter.
                        True!
                        but how which end of the traction faces te motor can make a difference.
                        I depending on the gauss reading for each end I can play with a few settings. 1> put the stronger end to the rear for more DF on the end of the car. 2>It can affect where the arm sits in the motor box. So if the arm is pressing against a bushing, I can flip the 1 or both tractions around to provide relief.

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                        • #27
                          We run stock stock Tyco cars at our club and the best are always the MALAYSIA chassis with the check mark and 4 dot rear bulk heads. I use the chrome brush springs along with the Tyco brushes and a 6.5 ohm wide gap arm. With the nature of plastic, all chassis seem to be a bit different even though itís stamped with MALAYSIA. I just keep trying until I find the one that is whisper quiet around the track. Look for the best rolling axle and wheel combination and find a good used one that the gears have already been well broken in. The HPX-2 magnets are definitely stronger than my best 440-X2 magnets. I have built many of these cars over the years and I have gone through so many parts just to cherry pick the best ones. Still a surprise to this day when a car without all the good stuff beats the pants off of the one that I thought was the ONE!! HAPPY RACING!!!
                          Last edited by ftnzguru; 03-21-2019, 07:12 AM.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by slotking View Post

                            True!
                            but how which end of the traction faces te motor can make a difference.
                            I depending on the gauss reading for each end I can play with a few settings. 1> put the stronger end to the rear for more DF on the end of the car. 2>It can affect where the arm sits in the motor box. So if the arm is pressing against a bushing, I can flip the 1 or both tractions around to provide relief.
                            Ah ha! Now that is what I suspected might be the case with my cars. I am (eventually) going to sit down and colour the ends of all the magnets that I've picked out so I can rotate them and measure and see what I get.

                            I have to say I am slightly stunned by quite how much effort and thought to variance of parts is involved in building a fast Tyco! I've got a pretty big array of different types of chassis and the 440X2 is definitely the most complicated to set up of the ones I've tried to tune so far!

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                            • #29
                              OK, if we are going full open kimono here how many of the old timers here de-wound their arms to get under 6 ohms resistance?
                              Also, anyone change the comm timing?

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by AptosC6 View Post
                                OK, if we are going full open kimono here how many of the old timers here de-wound their arms to get under 6 ohms resistance?
                                Also, anyone change the comm timing?
                                Never saw that de-wind thing........lol. J/K


                                - I use to slightly chamfer the stock bulkhead holes where the armature shaft passed through. Less friction

                                - My biggest....ummm...mod, was to bend the back of the rear of the chassis upward so that the bottom of the chassis was riding the rails , but could then be able to run taller rear tires. Could also run a steeper gear setup with the taller tires on certain tracks. Easy to do on the gray nylon chassis, but broke a few of the black chassis until I learned to heat them just right.

                                All the memories come rushing back.....

                                .

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