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Sidewinder scratch-built

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  • Sidewinder scratch-built

    Looking for a source for spur gears. Thanks!

  • #2
    Lucky Bob's. Give them a call.

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    • #3
      Thanks sir! Didn't see it on his web page, but that is nothing new. I will call LB.

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      • #4
        The sidewinder/anglewinder gears are not listed on his site, but a phone call will get them headed your way. Bob has been my source for them. Might I also suggest that you talk to him about gravity tires? Proper tires are really part of the magic foo-foo that allows this class of cars to perform in the manner that they do.

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        • #5
          A regular pancake car brass driven gear will work, the diameter of those is about 0.400 inches.

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          • #6
            Sometime in the dark ages I modified a Riggen chassis to make it into an anglewinder. It was the subject of an article I wrote for Car Model.

            I used a T-Jet 'Driven Gear' and an 'Armature Pinion' for the gearset. The motor was held in place with a 'clip', made of thin piano wire, soldered on top of the brass chassis. The rear axle was an AJ's silicone setup, with silicone tires bonded to aluminum wheels that screwed onto a threaded rear axle. There was a 4-40 thread on the axle, the wheels and the two jam nuts. I soldered the 'Driven Gear' to one of the jam nuts. I sandwiched the gear between two jam nuts on the axle, masked the teeth of the gear with rubber cement, and soldered it on using an acid flux to clean the joint. I only soldered it to one of the two jam nuts.

            The gear/jam nut assembly was threaded onto the rear axle, with the gear inboard, next to a rear wheel.

            The gear ratio would have been, if I remember correctly, 14:24 or 1.714 to 1. The gears meshed well despite not being designed for anglewinder service. It was a tall gear ratio, but the car ran well and outperformed the stock Riggen.

            The traditional open-frame HO motor is too large for true sidewinder service. The newer N and M class motors are more likely candidates. It may be possible to use T-Jet gears to fit up one of those can motors into a sidewinder. Certainly an anglewinder. The pinion gear will need a sleeve to fit onto a 1mm armature shaft. That's possible using precision stainless steel tubing. Hunt that up on the McMaster-Carr website. You might get lucky and engineer a press-fit. Otherwise you'll need Stay-Brite solder and flux, or you might be able to hold things together with Loctite. If soldering, consider the rubber-cement masking trick referenced above.

            Historical note: Dynamic introduced a box-stock anglewinder chassis way back in the day. It was not a success. I reviewed it for my Car Model "HO Model Proving Ground" series, but found lots of issues with the car. Car Model decided not to publish my review, and the "Dyna-Brute" did a quick fade. The few that made it onto the market are probably collectors' items now.

            Ed Bianchi
            Last edited by HO RacePro; 05-03-2019, 04:05 PM.

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            • #7
              Thanks Ed... you are the man!!

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              • #8
                Call Lucky Bob. He has 24 and 23 tooth gears from Quicker Engineering. They are available in .405" or .390" diameter if I recall correctly. A better choice than the T-Jet gears. They fit on a .059 axle and have enough meat to make it easier to press on straight. These are what I use in my anglewinders and sidewinders. If you are using a mini-motor M20, etc, Lucky Bob has Life-Like pinions that fit the shafts of those motors. Just make sure to let him know you want the ones that fit the mini-motor. If you are going to build a sidewinder, you'll have to use narrow tires. The Gravity tires Quicker Engineering makes are too wide for a sidewider. They will work on an anglewinder.

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                • #9
                  Thanks SSR, I talked to LB, and he was out of the Quicker gears... I will ping Rick directly and see if I can get some from him. Appreciate the info sir!

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                  • #10
                    Does anybody know if K&S is still in business? I stopped by a local hobby store yesterday, and they said they could no longer get it. Also, several local hardware stores have the display but both look like they have not been stocked in a LONG time (zip for choices). Was gonna try Hobby Lobby...but again, the hobby store dude said he doubts if they have it either. Thanks!

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                    • #11
                      ACE Hardware

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                      • #12
                        A web search shows them still alive and well. I would go with Ace as well.

                        Another option is Micro-Mark. But that would be mail order and no hands on purchase.

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                        • #13
                          I would expect that for a regular hardware store K&S stuff would be a slow mover, however my local hardware store is usually fully stocked with everything that K&S makes. My local hobby shop is usually rather depleted.

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                          • #14
                            I get my brass and piano wire supplies online. I forget the last place I ordered from, but a web search should turn up some results.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks all! Getting stock on-line.

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