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  • joey408w
    replied
    Originally posted by Hilltop Speedway View Post
    Also try a farm supply store such as Tractor Supply. They carry a lot of different size syringes and needles for use with glue... Just grind the sharp needle point down for safety...RM
    That's a good idea. The ones I bought from a hobby store are all plastic. In my testing, as I said before, the galv wire stays in the groove very well. I think I will only glue it if absolutely necessary, as that will hinder removal if I decide to take it down.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hilltop Speedway
    replied
    Also try a farm supply store such as Tractor Supply. They carry a lot of different size syringes and needles for use with glue... Just grind the sharp needle point down for safety...RM

    Leave a comment:


  • joey408w
    replied
    Galvanized wire

    Originally posted by Coyote Red View Post
    I would have never thought to consider galvanized wire. Used commonly to protect steel from outdoor elements like UV, water, etc., zinc (galv) is "lost" over time ultimately revealing the bare steel underneath, which could then rust. In an indoor application though, it should last a very very long time. Tomy/Tyco track is essentially bare steel (I would be interested if they concern themselves with moisture at all). Back to the galvanization on the braided wire.. My only concern would then be the friction wear from pick-ups, which I can't believe would be an issue.

    Are you using epoxy to secure the braid?
    I'm going to apply a small bead of epoxy with a syringe I found in a hobby store to permanently attach the braid, although I have found after all the priming and painting, the wire seems to stay in the groove pretty darn well (at least on my test track). I ran my cars down the test track with no glue, and they didn't pull the wire up at all. I'm pretty happy with this discovery so far. Please see my latest post for more pics-

    Leave a comment:


  • joey408w
    replied
    Dragstrip

    More photos of construction. the table is 24' long, leveled in both axes with 5/16" lag bolts screwed into the bottom of 2X2's attached to the legs. At the end, I decided to do a turnaround to the return road, in lieu of a longer track with a shutdown area. I made styrene guides, painted with red diagonal stripes, to sling the cars back in the right direction. The turnaround and return are painted black to simulate asphalt. Haven't installed power rails yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Coyote Red
    replied
    Originally posted by joey408w View Post
    ..this stuff is consistently tight and smooth and much finer. Keep in mind that it is seven braids of seven strands each- all in a 1/16 diameter.
    I would have never thought to consider galvanized wire. Used commonly to protect steel from outdoor elements like UV, water, etc., zinc (galv) is "lost" over time ultimately revealing the bare steel underneath, which could then rust. In an indoor application though, it should last a very very long time. Tomy/Tyco track is essentially bare steel (I would be interested if they concern themselves with moisture at all). Back to the galvanization on the braided wire.. My only concern would then be the friction wear from pick-ups, which I can't believe would be an issue.

    Are you using epoxy to secure the braid?

    Leave a comment:


  • Coyote Red
    replied
    Originally posted by joey408w View Post
    The stuff I'm using is very quiet- and unlike picture wire, which tends to be coarse, this stuff is consistently tight and smooth and much finer. Keep in mind that it is seven braids of seven strands each- all in a 1/16 diameter. I doubt that you'll find any picture wire that consists of 49 strands! See photos for pic of spool with info. In the photos you will see my 10" wide X 96" long track made from 3/4 MDF with plain sliced maple veneer. This was left over from a cabinet job I did, so I thought I would try it. I primed it after routing with PPG K38 primer surfacer, sanded it with 180 dry, and sprayed a couple of coats od PPG DPL 48 Epoxy primer tinted to look like the color of concrete. It is a very smooth surface- silicones should stick like crazy. I also experimented with one piece that I treated like fine cabinetry and primed it with Campbell's AC Sealer, sanded with 320 dry and finished with 2 coats of Duravar Plus catalyzed clear. It looks like a bowling alley! The lanes are 4" apart with 3" on each side.
    Awesome stuff. The veneer looks great, as does the table construction. Thanks! Post more...

    Leave a comment:


  • Hilltop Speedway
    replied
    If it's quite and smooth, looks like you have a winner!!! Please keep us posted as to how well it works: sound, shoe wear, electrical conductivity, arcing, etc. The strands would be great for giving a little glue something to bite to, to hold it in the slot. Again, please keep us posted, Thanks, RM

    Leave a comment:


  • joey408w
    replied
    http://slotcarillustrated.com/portal/forums/images/editor/color.gif

    Originally posted by Hilltop Speedway View Post
    Guys, I tried a type of wire like that, (which looks like stranded wire for hanging pictures). It is flexible and great to lay in the slot. The problem I had was the sound that was created when your car ran on it. Mine gave a kind of roar which I'm guessing is from the twisted wire and the small gaps. I tried it on a 4x8 type oval. You might want to experiment first before doing the whole track...Only a suggestion...RM
    The stuff I'm using is very quiet- and unlike picture wire, which tends to be coarse, this stuff is consistently tight and smooth and much finer. Keep in mind that it is seven braids of seven strands each- all in a 1/16 diameter. I doubt that you'll find any picture wire that consists of 49 strands! See photos for pic of spool with info. In the photos you will see my 10" wide X 96" long track made from 3/4 MDF with plain sliced maple veneer. This was left over from a cabinet job I did, so I thought I would try it. I primed it after routing with PPG K38 primer surfacer, sanded it with 180 dry, and sprayed a couple of coats od PPG DPL 48 Epoxy primer tinted to look like the color of concrete. It is a very smooth surface- silicones should stick like crazy. I also experimented with one piece that I treated like fine cabinetry and primed it with Campbell's AC Sealer, sanded with 320 dry and finished with 2 coats of Duravar Plus catalyzed clear. It looks like a bowling alley! The lanes are 4" apart with 3" on each side.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hilltop Speedway
    replied
    Guys, I tried a type of wire like that, (which looks like stranded wire for hanging pictures). It is flexible and great to lay in the slot. The problem I had was the sound that was created when your car ran on it. Mine gave a kind of roar which I'm guessing is from the twisted wire and the small gaps. I tried it on a 4x8 type oval. You might want to experiment first before doing the whole track...Only a suggestion...RM

    Leave a comment:


  • joey408w
    replied
    Galvanized wire

    Originally posted by Coyote Red View Post
    Does this wire have a trade/manufacturer name? Do you have pics of your test pieces, or anything you put together so far?
    Hey Coyote. I will take some photos tomorrow. The wire is a 7X7 braided (seven strands each with seven wires) 1/16" diameter. It really lays down smoothly into the grooves. See attached pic. Has similar magnetic grip to Tyco track. I will also post detailed info about this product.

    According to Brad <[email protected]> the steel wire (rebar) has too much grip. I have yet to test this braided wire on a road course, but it seems to work on my dragstrip experiment. You could use a stainless braided for no magenetic effect.

    Joey

    Leave a comment:


  • Coyote Red
    replied
    Originally posted by NJSLOT1_32 View Post
    Thanks for the info. One of the challengs is that I don't want to use a slide guide on the HO cars, I want to use their standard pickups. Seems that braid doesn't work to well with those pickups, so I'll need to do something similar to rebar tie wire, but with a non-magnetic, or if I have to, lesser magnetic substance.
    I could be wrong about this, but my view is that the braid would be very tight and therefore smooth. I'd have to physically see some, and maybe even make a test to see how/if it would work.

    A similiar alternative might be flexible braided copper wire. Essentially the same except circular vs. flat. But again, I'd have to physically handle it to see if I think it would work.

    I agree, I wouldn't want to change pick-ups or guide, but want to avoid setting rails, at least on my first attempt.

    Leave a comment:


  • NJSLOT1_32
    replied
    Thanks for the info. One of the challengs is that I don't want to use a slide guide on the HO cars, I want to use their standard pickups. Seems that braid doesn't work to well with those pickups, so I'll need to do something similar to rebar tie wire, but with a non-magnetic, or if I have to, lesser magnetic substance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Coyote Red
    replied
    Originally posted by NJSLOT1_32 View Post
    I'm planning to route an HO track after years of running on plastic and tiring of the high downforce cars. I'm now looking to have as close to zero magnetism as possible, as several of us want to run T-Jet and non-Magnatraction cars and clones. Stainless steel seems to be what would work for me, but I'm now thinking about testing stranded wire.

    Anybody know if there's a composition of stranded wire that has non-magnetic properties?

    Thanks.
    You sound a little like what I've been thinking. I don't want to completely get out of magnet cars, but I wouldn't mind having a small track specifically for non-magnet, and I think it would be easier to build, before attempting a track for magnet cars which would mean rails vs. braid (potentially). A quick internet search shows there are many sources for .125 inch flat copper braid. There is some discussion (not HO based) in the routed track forum...

    http://www.slotcarillustrated.com/po...ad.php?t=19350

    Leave a comment:


  • NJSLOT1_32
    replied
    Originally posted by joey408w View Post
    After experimenting with rebar (rhumba wire), galvanized 16 gauge ceiling hanger wire, picture hanger wire, and searching all over the internet for answers, I discovered at a small hardware store in my area a galvanized stranded 1/16" wire that is perfect for the power rails. ...
    I'm planning to route an HO track after years of running on plastic and tiring of the high downforce cars. I'm now looking to have as close to zero magnetism as possible, as several of us want to run T-Jet and non-Magnatraction cars and clones. Stainless steel seems to be what would work for me, but I'm now thinking about testing stranded wire.

    Anybody know if there's a composition of stranded wire that has non-magnetic properties?

    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Coyote Red
    replied
    Originally posted by joey408w View Post
    After experimenting with rebar (rhumba wire), galvanized 16 gauge ceiling hanger wire, picture hanger wire, and searching all over the internet for answers, I discovered at a small hardware store in my area a galvanized stranded 1/16" wire that is perfect for the power rails. The problem I had with rebar wire was that I could not get it to lay down smooth without bumps, and it wouldn't stay in the grooves without some kind of glue. The gavanized wire comes on 500ft. rolls, costs 8 cents a foot, stays perfectly straight, conforms to curves, and I can attach it permanently by injecting a fine bead of epoxy with a syringe (found in most hobby stores) before pressing it into the slot. The rebar wire had to be clamped in some way while the glue dried, which was next to impossible. This wire is the best solution Ive found so far. I haven't had any problems with oxidizing with this brand I am using.
    Does this wire have a trade/manufacturer name? Do you have pics of your test pieces, or anything you put together so far?

    Leave a comment:

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