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  • StockTomyFTW
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    ..
    Last edited by StockTomyFTW; 12-08-2010, 11:21 AM.

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  • StockTomyFTW
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    ..
    Last edited by StockTomyFTW; 12-08-2010, 11:21 AM.

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  • Maddman
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    The way that this track adds voltage up, spanning the track with both hands could be quite dangerous and potentially LETHAL. This is especially true if your hands were wet with sweat. The only way to make this idea safe is to route a gap between each lane and the next. That way the track can be wired conventionally and be as safe as any other HO track.

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  • TjetTim
    replied
    I just logged back here in search of an easier, cheaper way of getting a track that's better than afx and by jove ... that steel is revolutionary! My mind is blown and couldn't sleep last night after reading posts.

    Awesome work Charlie and thanks for posting the details and letting us in on your brilliant track.

    The other steel HO tracks in the wilds of the internet was on a hobbytalk forum - and very hard to google for. Not sure if it's okay by mods to post a link to it .. but the thread is here: http://www.hobbytalk.com/bbs1/showthread.php?t=180536

    The lanes are completely separated though on that one.

    I'm sold, and now that you've posted the build details I'm sold on being able to build one. It looks a lot easier than traditional routed wooden track ?

    A self interested question -- have you run t-jets on it?

    I'm newb here so excuse the presumption ... but would it be useful to start a thread on 'steel HO tracks' now that routed tracks have their own sub forum?

    I've seen the future and it glints like steel.

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  • StockTomyFTW
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    ..
    Last edited by StockTomyFTW; 12-08-2010, 11:21 AM.

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  • StockTomyFTW
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    ..
    Last edited by StockTomyFTW; 12-08-2010, 11:20 AM.

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  • Slott V
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    Hey thanks for taking the time to do that. I understand the principal now I guess I didn't expect a controller to stay isolated to a lane when sharing a pole. If two adjacent lanes both switch the polarity and used a positive pole on the same leg I start thinking 2 lanes would be have crossed input. But hey if it's working for you than no need to over think it right?

    Way cool the way you routed the track and have the squeeze lanes. I like how the layout cuts through a virtual parking lot too. I'd love to drive that track.

    Has anyone ever pointed you to the other steel track floating around the online slot community?

    Scott V.

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  • StockTomyFTW
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    ..
    Last edited by StockTomyFTW; 12-07-2010, 09:54 AM.

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  • StockTomyFTW
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    Last edited by StockTomyFTW; 12-08-2010, 11:20 AM.

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  • Rolls
    replied
    Slott_V, I think I see what's missing in your photo.

    The inside lane's "-" is also the next lane's "+". For each lane, the driver's side "rail" is positive with respect to the passenger's side rail *of that lane.*

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  • Slott V
    replied
    Wow thanks for the quick reply.

    I'm still confused: how can a piece of metal share + and - between slots? There would have to also be a gap between + and -, no? What am I missing? Sorry if I'm being a pain.

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  • StockTomyFTW
    replied
    BananaSMOOTHIE posted polarities for a 4 lane track. Its layed out like this :: +slot-+slot-+slot-+slot-+slot-+slot-. Or if one lane is reversed :: +Slot-+slot-+slot--slot++slot- and so forth. Like I said sometimes the UNlearning can be the hardest part. As far as my "secrets" are concerned, I think I pretty much blew my wad on that
    Hope that helps.
    Charlie.

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  • Slott V
    replied
    Originally posted by Bananasmoothie1975 View Post
    wow - I'll say it again - wow..

    I feel silly for not thinking of voltages in series for adjacent lanes - could also be done with a direct dc voltage for each lane:
    + -+ -+ -+ -


    Say 12V for each lane, overall volts from Lane 1 + to Lane 4 - would be 48V

    VERY impressed with your track Thanks for sharing vid, pics and info
    The routing and layout of this metal track is very cool. But I'm having trouble understanding how power is sent to each slot>? I'm pretty good with understanding electrical engineering but this one has me stumped. I know you don't want to give away 'secrets' but maybe someone can help explain this better. If you look at my attached photo, this is what I get when I try to pair up positive and negative feeds for this track. It doesn't jive with what Banana posted. Grounds can be common but not power feeds so the pairing leaves gaps.



    Last edited by Slott V; 10-22-2010, 09:42 AM.

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  • StockTomyFTW
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    ..
    Last edited by StockTomyFTW; 12-08-2010, 11:20 AM.

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  • Grandcheapskate
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    Originally posted by StockTomyFTW View Post
    Air cooling is for the bit. When you cut the slot the metal hits the bit at the same place all the time. You need to keep it cool or it will burn up in a hurry.

    Edit:: Yes Joe you glue the metal to the masonite first then cut the slots. The slot goes all the way through the metal and this gap insulates each lane. This is also why metal pins to low can short your lane.

    Charlie.
    Hi Charlie,
    Thanks for all that information.

    The idea of building a metal track has appealed to me since I first heard it could be done. I remember back in college someone saying to me "Wouldn't it be great if the whole surface was electrified". That was back in the 70s and I've had the thought in the back of my mind ever since.

    How does one air cool the bit during routing? And what slot size did you use - 1/16" or 1/8"?

    Different metals have different magnetic attracting properties. The two factors effecting downforce would be the thickness of the metal and the composition of the metal. I guess you want the thinest metal you can get so as to put the least amount of strain of the router (in addition to reducing the downforce). And finding a metal composition which has just the right amount of magnetic properties would be critical.

    You mention that the metal is laid on top of masonite. I could suggest something that would make routing even easier. Mount the metal onto a foam/styrofoam type board which has a stiffer board material (plywood?) under it. This would mean that the router only has to cut through the metal and foam - the underlying plywood is only for support and does not get routed.

    Also, having never looked for metal sheets, how much do they cost?

    Thoughts?

    Thanks...Joe

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