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What will fit on the 1/32 strombecker chassis

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  • What will fit on the 1/32 strombecker chassis

    besides a strombecker body ?

    Any advice is appreciated.
    gorp

  • #2
    Hi Gorp, Many of the Strombecker chassis have adjustable wheelbase(s), so , you could potentially fit a wide variety of bodies. You may need to reposition the body posts to align with the mounting holes on your particular chassis, but, this is relatively easy.

    To be of more help, it would be nice to find out (pic.) which Strombecker chassis you have....there are many!!........some are quite good, some may not be worth the effort.

    Cheers
    Chris Walker

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    • #3
      It would be nice to know why anybody would choose to use a Strombecker chassis ...

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      • #4
        Yeah, what Chris said. Given that, I don't know if you use Facebook, but there is a very good Strombecker page, with a lot of homegrown upgrades you can do for a Strombecker chassis.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Wet Coast Racer View Post
          It would be nice to know why anybody would choose to use a Strombecker chassis ...

          Well,......a couple of reasons!!

          1/ Some folks place a value on having/assembling a completely original vintage car.

          2/ The 2 piece brass Strombecker is a very nice (read good performing) chassis......with a few tweaks they will perform as well as all but the best plastic stuff.

          Cheers
          Chris Walker

          Below is a pic. of a completely stock brass Strombecker chassis/car.......with a few mods., they can run very very well!!

          Last edited by chrisguyw; 06-05-2017, 06:53 PM.

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          • #6
            Chris is right about that, I have several and other than the old motors don't brake as well as the modern ones, the cars can be as fast and smooth as almost any of the modern cars. The plastic and aluminum chassis were more of a toy quality but I have seen some very decent cars built out of them.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by chrisguyw View Post
              Well,......a couple of reasons!!

              1/ Some folks place a value on having/assembling a completely original vintage car.

              2/ The 2 piece brass Strombecker is a very nice (read good performing) chassis......with a few tweaks they will perform as well as all but the best plastic stuff.

              Cheers
              Chris Walker

              Below is a pic. of a completely stock brass Strombecker chassis/car.......with a few mods., they can run very very well!!


              I have 3 of these chassis, Chris, one in a Strombecker Cheetah, one in a Lotus30, also Strombecker and the other one waiting for a body. They run very well as you say with just a little tweaking. Our vintage club runs one true vintage class during our race season and these chassis perform very well compared to other vintage chassis.

              Tom

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              • #8
                I must admit, I've never encountered one of those brass chassis.

                All I ever owned were those black plastic ones, and they never impressed; particularly the poor bushings and gear mesh.

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                • #9
                  Several of the "Toy Companies" made what they call a competition chassis, along with "race" motors.

                  Monogram also made several versions of brass chassis that was out of lighter gauge material and handled very well, and if geared right had brakes almost as good as todays motors.

                  Eldon's was called the "concourse" chassis and it had a drop arm. I've only seen two examples, mine handles just so so, I have no idea how they were when new.

                  The early Revell's had an aluminum chassis, these were the expensive cars when I was a kid.

                  Early MRRC were also brass, I have their Maserati 250 which handles very nice.

                  There was also an upgraded plastic chassis for Eldon that has an angle winder configuration and the motor is set lower for a better center of gravity, I don't know if these were from Eldon of sold as an aftermarket item. I have a couple but they have no markings on them.

                  Strombecker also made a metal chassis for their F1 cars, I have a Lotus 38 that I occasionally run against the modern cars. It hasn't won outright yet, but it's never last either.
                  Last edited by Mitch58; 06-06-2017, 06:20 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mitch58 View Post

                    There was also an upgraded plastic chassis for Eldon that has an angle winder configuration and the motor is set lower for a better center of gravity, I don't know if these were from Eldon of sold as an aftermarket item. I have a couple but they have no markings on them.


                    I believe that was a Cox/Eldon car (after Cox bought Eldon). I have a couple. Even with the anglewinder, lower COG, and some fresh urethanes...not so good.

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                    • #11
                      Strombecker made a first series of metal chassied 1/32 cars in 1965, using standard bodies: Porsche, Lotus, XKE and GTO. Chassis was similar to the brass chassis they used in their 1/23 F1 cars and the 1/32 Mercedies, just a front section that bolted on a Scuttler motor.

                      They also made their Aston Martin 007 kit with this motor, and it's a pretty good performer. I lent one to a friend at this year's Bordo vintage meeting and he finished 13th out of 43 in the 1/32 race... (But I think it had the 6V Avenger motor instead of the standard Scuttler).

                      Plastic chassis were white, gray and black, depending on the era and motor - a long and complicated subject! There were even articles in period magazines on adapting different bodies to these, since until about 64 or so, there wasn't much else around in terms of commercial car kits...

                      The Monogram chassis were all metal - it's only with Mono-Revell that they made plastic chassis. Monogram came right after Revell, and their first series brass pan chassis work very well with a bit of weight and stiffness.

                      Don

                      PS: Competition series GTO and chassis, from my phototheque:



                      Last edited by dgersh; 07-26-2017, 02:50 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dgersh View Post
                        The Monogram chassis were all metal - it's only with Mono-Revell that they made plastic chassis. Monogram came right after Revell, and their first series brass pan chassis work very well with a bit of weight and stiffness.
                        If I'm not mistaken, the chassis in the Monogram F1 Ferrari and Lotus 33 SET cars were plastic (their kit counterparts were brass).

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                        • #13
                          Right you are Todd! Seems every time I get categorical about something, I'm wrong.

                          Don

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