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It's time to stop working on a project

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  • noddaz
    started a topic It's time to stop working on a project

    It's time to stop working on a project

    Time to stop when you ruin the motor. Just stop and set the project aside for another day.
    Scott

  • noddaz
    replied
    Originally posted by HO RacePro View Post
    My suggestion -- press the sleeve into the pinion gear first, then press that assembly onto the motor shaft.

    'Nother suggestion. Consider using Loctite and a close slip-fit instead of a press-fit. Just make sure the Loctite stays out of the motor bushing.

    Ed Bianchi
    Thank you. That sounds like what I should have done. But no.. I had to try and shortcut and go for the two-fer one press. lol

    Scott

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  • HO RacePro
    replied
    My suggestion -- press the sleeve into the pinion gear first, then press that assembly onto the motor shaft.

    'Nother suggestion. Consider using Loctite and a close slip-fit instead of a press-fit. Just make sure the Loctite stays out of the motor bushing.

    Ed Bianchi

    Leave a comment:


  • noddaz
    replied
    A learning process it is. I was trying to press a sleeve onto a MT SL-1 motor shaft so I could then press a pinion gear onto the sleeve. Instead I pressed the front bushing into the can. Life goes on. I will order another 14k motor of some sort for this build.

    Scott

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  • HO RacePro
    replied
    Taking a timeout can be very constructive. I think all of us have come up against a problem, tried to fix it, and made things worse. We'd have been better off to put down the tools and walk away, but we were too engaged.

    That doesn't mean giving up. It means giving that big mushy thing between your ears time to reassess the situation and come up with a better way to handle it. That can also mean hitting the books (these days, the internet) as well as commiserating with friends and graybeards on sites like this one.

    All too often reality is trying to teach you something. Either that you didn't really understand what you were messing with, or you were using the wrong tools, or not using them properly.

    Be very receptive to those lessons. Failure is the great teacher. If you learn the lessons you have not really failed. You have managed to educate yourself. Consider the cost, the time and the effort expended tuition.

    Ed Bianchi

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  • s.o.f.
    replied
    Agreed. I have had to do so when I ruined a windscreen, exhaust pipe, paint job, decal, tire sanding, clear coat etc. etc. etc. Just set it aside and the solution always surfaces.

    Leave a comment:


  • s.o.f.
    replied
    Agreed. I have had to do when I have ruined a windscreen, exhaust pipe, paint job, decal, etc. etc. etc. Just set it aside and the solution always surfaces.

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  • glen
    replied
    What project was this?

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