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  • #16
    Originally posted by Gone Racin View Post
    Hardly steeling, those are all pretty conventional chassis features that scratch builders have been using of decades. Nothing wrong with rather nicely built conventional of course.
    I have not seen anyone use a triangulated mount soldered under the front axle or anyone else using a collar drilled out for a guide mount and no one else has ever used a Slot It bushing soldered in to a triple triangulated mount for the rear axle bushings. Hardly conventional.

    Ken

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Ecurie Martini View Post

      BTW, the wheel/tire set up is typical of racing TCs in the 50s - 5:50 - 6:00 X 15 on the rear, 4:50 X 18 on the front.

      EM
      The standard size wheel for the TC is/was 19" x 4.5". Although a 15" x 5:50-6:00 may have been used it would have been an exception, not typical of TCs that raced in the 50's.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by mmmoose1 View Post
        I have not seen anyone use a triangulated mount soldered under the front axle or anyone else using a collar drilled out for a guide mount and no one else has ever used a Slot It bushing soldered in to a triple triangulated mount for the rear axle bushings. Hardly conventional.

        Ken
        Sometimes deceptively simple appearance hides the complex thought that went into a well executed design .

        cheers
        Scott

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        • #19
          Originally posted by mmmoose1 View Post
          I have not seen anyone use a triangulated mount soldered under the front axle or anyone else using a collar drilled out for a guide mount and no one else has ever used a Slot It bushing soldered in to a triple triangulated mount for the rear axle bushings. Hardly conventional.

          Ken
          Not saying they aren't well built.
          The back ends I saw decades ago with bushings soldered in just like that would have been some other make because slot it didn't exist that long ago.
          Apart from the trivial detail of what make of bush was used, everything else I've seen years ago.
          Last edited by Gone Racin; 08-16-2011, 12:15 PM.

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          • #20
            Anybody have a source for rear motor and front guide brackets for 1/32 cars for scratchbuilding? I've seen a couple at PM and other sites but I can't tell what motors they fit and weather they are for 1/32 or 1/24. Any thoughts or tips?
            Thanks,
            Pat Rolland

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            • #21
              Originally posted by o3raledale View Post
              Anybody have a source for rear motor and front guide brackets for 1/32 cars for scratchbuilding? I've seen a couple at PM and other sites but I can't tell what motors they fit and weather they are for 1/32 or 1/24. Any thoughts or tips?
              Thanks,
              Pat Rolland
              Hello Pat

              The brackets from Professor Motor will work on FC130 or FK180 motors that have the horizontal holes in the motor and can be used for either 1/24th or 1/32nd. If you are looking for a bracket for a FF-050 motor you will have to look up AB Slotsport in the UK to find them.

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              • #22
                Ken's cars

                Ken,

                Well, I'm more than happy. And I'm pleased that this order took you over the half century mark. I'm looking forward to your tutorial on my visit in early October. (I'm anxious to graduate from my 8 gram bracket builds).

                All the best,

                Mark

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                • #23
                  Ken,
                  Thanks for the info.
                  -Pat

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                  • #24
                    you will have to look up AB Slotsport in the UK to find them
                    I have used these and although they are fiddly to assemble (regular or offset) they work well.
                    These brackets are available in steel or brass and are a little longer in the motor to axle spec than the BWA item.

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                    • #25
                      My have told me there have been some phone calls made wanting to know the secret in the design of the new chassis. The photo posted is just a teaser since you cannot make out any detail.
                      It makes me feel good knowing the guys who made the calls are some of my longtime heroes.

                      Ken

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Robert Livingston View Post
                        My theory is that low torque motors (as we use in the NC1 classes) don't have enough torque to require sidewinders for optimal performance. So, as long as the CG is low, the inline slim can should be the way to go in the lo-po classes. Currently I'm contemplating a vac-body Maserati A6GCS with a VRAA F1 style chassis for the TLOR (Class 1). I just found a pile of BWA front and rear slim-can axle brackets in the shadowy recesses of my warehouse. Now, if only I could motivate my factory workers . . .
                        Yes, the torque of these motors really will not influence chassis behavior. I use sidewinders in the small cars for two reasons: as in the case of the Testa Rossa chassis above it affords room for a detailed cockpit but, more frequently, to achieve a high polar moment of inertia by concentrating the weight of the motor as close as possible to the rear axle. I find that the behavior cars built this way best suits my driving style (or lack thereof)

                        Originally posted by mgtracer View Post
                        The standard size wheel for the TC is/was 19" x 4.5". Although a 15" x 5:50-6:00 may have been used it would have been an exception, not typical of TCs that raced in the 50's.
                        thanks for the correction on the wheel size I evidently misplaced an inch somewhere in the last 50+ years! On your second point, my recollection is that the substitution of a 15 inch or 16 inch wheel and correspondingly wider tire at the rear was common practice. The "serious" TC's often appeared minus hood (bonnet) side panels exhibiting the Marshall Nordec blower for all to see. The front fenders were frequently bobbed or replaced with cycle fenders. the image was impressive the performance a little less so. In particular, the combination of a solid front axle and a steering mechanism which influenced rather than controlled the wheel attitude made traction of the front a minor concern. That said, they were great fun and crumpet catchers par excellence on the campuses of the Eastern girls schools.


                        Originally posted by munter View Post
                        I have used these and although they are fiddly to assemble (regular or offset) they work well.
                        These brackets are available in steel or brass and are a little longer in the motor to axle spec than the BWA item.
                        one tip on assembling these brackets: I find it very helpful to insert and fix the bearings prior to assembly and solder up the box with an axle in place.

                        This thread has caused me to reflect on my own approaches. I have spent over 15 years cobbling together chassis with a variety of types of flex, hinges and other forms of built-in motion. While it is clear that these games are real benefit when one is dealing with a quarter million RPM motors and two inch-wide tires flying around a Blue King the importance for the kind of models discussed here is less obvious.

                        Indeed, Ken's approach of "simplificate and add lightness" is, based on the results seen in the IPS and VRAA series, very effective. It appears that these cars are quick and, of paramount importance in proxy racing, easy to drive.

                        Now I'm not certain that this insight would change my approach. At the end of the day, I build these toys for my own amusement and it amuses me to build chassis that, in the tire kicking comparison stage prior to the beginning of the race series, carry just a bit of an intimidation factor!

                        Now where did I put that bottle of silicon damping fluid?

                        EM

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                        • #27
                          I still have an experimental graphite 'spring' chassis from the R/C days. For a pan car, it handles very well in an autocross. I had rigged four wheel independent suspension with a floating rear from a dirt car and it would run circles around the other cars. That concept still rattles around in my head when I think about creating a 'new' chassis.

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                          • #28
                            Something tells me that I'll just get hurt trying to copy something so simple.
                            As someone looking to build a homemade chassis that will work with an SCXd chip, I find that dropped axle very interesting.

                            Very nice work.

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