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Building a better Cox chassis

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  • Building a better Cox chassis

    Hello Folks, My first "serious" 1/24 slotcar was a Cox Team Modified Cheetah, and I really thought it was the real deal, until I took it to the local commercial track........from that point I looked elsewhere in my quest for speed. I still love the Cox cars, and have always wanted to try and make one go!!!. The annual vintage slot car meet in Bordeaux France, has always been on my bucket list, so with the intent of making it there in the next year or two, I decided to get on with my Cox project.

    For those that know the Cox chassis, there were a few things I needed to address 1/ Freeze the drop arm, 2/Build in some guide height adjustability, 3/ Lower the front end and still run Scale tires (a Bordeaux rule), and 4/ add some chassis pans (weight) low and wide. Additionally, I wanted to engineer a piece that would let me easily return the chassis to stock should the need arise.

    So for those that know the chassis, you will appreciate the changes/mods made....for those not familiar with the Cox chassis, the pictures are still fun to look at

    Cheers
    Chris Walker

    PS I did some local commercial track testing today, and the chassis has exceeded my expectations.


    The first pic. is of the finished chassis.......it is the "Dino" Team Modified chassis, which used the FT16D motor, a much better race chassis than the 36D version. It is powered by a John Havlicek TTX150 motor,.....so it goes fast!



    An underside view of the chassis pan assembly.....



    A pic. of the front end detail.......new front axle tube assembly, and detail on freezing the drop arm/adjusting the guide height.





    The complete pan/axle assembly....slips over the front of the stock chassis, and is secured by 3 machine screws, and no modifications/holes drilled in the stock chassis........priceless!!


  • #2
    Beautiful workmanship, there!

    The annual vintage slot car meet in Bordeaux France
    When do they hold this event? By chance, I expect to be in that general part of the world next fall.

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    • #3
      Artistry!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Wet Coast Racer View Post

        When do they hold this event? By chance, I expect to be in that general part of the world next fall.
        Hi Wet, The 2017 event is being held June 10/11.........you could always move your trip ahead a few months....Slot cars, then hang around for LeMans.......the Mrs. will love it!!

        Cheers
        Chris Walker

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        • #5
          I've no idea if that actually improves the performance of the car, but it's a work of art. Given all of the aftermarket 'add ons' that were made and sold, back in the day, for something like the Dynamic chassis line, I'm surprised nobody thought to make and sell these back in the 60's.

          Especially if they improve the handling of the Cox cars. As many as were made/sold in the 60's, somebody thinking to make these back then might have made a pretty penny, for a year or two.
          Last edited by tlbrace; 11-15-2016, 07:59 AM.

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          • #6
            Chris,

            Could you briefly explain how you get that concours finish on your metal work? Do you shot tumble it?

            Thanx,

            Bill

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            • #7
              Excellent engineering and flawless execution.

              EM

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              • #8
                Originally posted by model murdering View Post
                Chris,

                Could you briefly explain how you get that concours finish on your metal work? Do you shot tumble it?

                Thanx,

                Bill
                Hi Bill, Unfortunately, I do not have a tumbler....so......first, I try not to get too much solder where I don't want it, then some 800 and 1500 grit paper followed by a quick rub with Simichrome or Brasso metal polish.

                It would be much easier (and likely look better) if I bought a tumbler

                Cheers
                Chris Walker

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by chrisguyw View Post
                  Hi Bill, Unfortunately, I do not have a tumbler....so......first, I try not to get too much solder where I don't want it, then some 800 and 1500 grit paper followed by a quick rub with Simichrome or Brasso metal polish.

                  It would be much easier (and likely look better) if I bought a tumbler

                  Cheers
                  Chris Walker
                  Thank you for the reply Chris!

                  It explains a lot. The tumbler couldnt compete with your hand polished sculptures, but now I'm wondering if a tumbler might not be a labor saving intermediate step; where one could leave off, and call the peened finish good, or then elect to go beyond and proceed to the lustrous hand polished look.

                  I do pretty the same here with respect to metal finishing. I start with directional soldering, kiss any nibs with the file; then use 600 and 1200, knuckle busting elbow grease, and polish where I can get in. Naturally I'm always looking for edge.

                  While I dont have near as much ground to cover as large scale builders do; it's often difficult because everything gets tediously proximal when the scale divisor is doubled. It's actually one of the more frustrating aspects for Mr. Chubby fingers. Probably my biggest issue is the removal of flux and stainage in tight around the joints. I fake it with a wire wheel or wire brush, then polish using a rotary nylo brush in the moto-tool.

                  It's looking like a good excuse to detour into the sporting goods department.
                  Last edited by model murdering; 11-15-2016, 04:14 PM.

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