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Torque Acceleration Braking Crabbing Momentum Inertia Part 1

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  • #61
    It is clear that if you hold the rear wheels immovable, and give a car power, it will lift the nose. As you say, this is easy to demonstrate. But a moving slot car doesn't quite have the wheels fixed in place. I suppose it lifts the nose less, but still does to an extent, as the road surface and the tire grip provide resistance. I guess this is what they mean by "the pinion climbs the gear". I just never thought of it that way.

    As for the 36D's, let us draw a veil of discretion over that.
    Schwing!!!

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    • #62
      Very good there SS...I have so many responses it hurts....
      Robert, I tried the experiment as I described it and did experience some lift of the front end with an in-line drive. This is not an easy experiment as, with the wheels off the ground, the amount of torque being generated by the motor is minute....as with amps, you only produce what you need to overcome the load. I had to make sure there was only a very small amount of weight on the braids.
      I also tried it with a sidewinder but unfortunately, the reactionary force along the axis of the motor exceeded that of the gears/axle so the car's nose actually dipped. This is the reaction we have been talking about earlier in this thread....that the motor torque applies forces to the chassis.
      SuperSlabs suggestion of holding the back wheels would be a better example of this experiment....you could connect the aligator clips from your controller directly to the braids if you can counteract their weight....I guess let the car hang vertically as you hold the back wheels. See if the car tries to rotate when you hit the gas....

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      • #63
        Sorry if I seem a bit simple here, but isn't all of this action/reaction stuff already understood (Newton's 3rd law) and evident by the behaviour of dragsters and helicopters? Of course an inline car tries to lift it's nose! And it will do so, with greater success the better the bite of the rear tires!

        Regarding RL's remarks regarding braking on a pencil, so to speak, this brief Stranger video is worthy of observation:

        [youtube]PIFczdxeYpU[/youtube]

        If a sidewinder car used the pinion shaft of the motor as the rear axle, then naturally it would lift the front end in similar fashion to an inline car, only more so due to the greater amount of weight toward the rear; but because the torque (and if I am using the wrong word there then get over it OK) is transferred to the spur gear the effect is reversed, and the front end is forced down under acceleration instead of being raised; likewise, the sidewinder car will brake better as the forces work in the opposite direction.

        Now while that stuff is simple and obvious (at least to me, being a High School graduate and everything), figuring out why a motor sitting on the bench and having power applied will twist sideways every time, whilst apparently that same motor sitting in an inline car apparently won't apply more power to rear tire than the other (which I think is where this Thread got started) has still not been satisfactorily explained by anyone so far.

        So there!
        Last edited by Wet Coast Racer; 10-15-2008, 06:16 PM.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by Wet Coast Racer View Post
          . . . figuring out why a motor sitting on the bench and having power applied will twist sideways every time, whilst apparently that same motor sitting in an inline car apparently won't apply more power to rear tire than the other (which I think is where this Thread got started) has still not been satisfactorily explained by anyone so far.
          So there!
          You are speaking rhetorically, no? Yes!

          An inline motor applies more "weight" to one rear tire than the other on acceleration, and more to the other tire on braking. The higher the traction, the more "weight". If the rear wheels spin, not much differnce. If there is high grip, more motor torque (acceleration or braking) is developed, and applied on one side.
          Last edited by Robert Livingston; 10-16-2008, 04:14 AM.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by Wet Coast Racer View Post


            Now while that stuff is simple and obvious (at least to me, being a High School graduate and everything), figuring out why a motor sitting on the bench and having power applied will twist sideways every time, whilst apparently that same motor sitting in an inline car apparently won't apply more power to rear tire than the other (which I think is where this Thread got started) has still not been satisfactorily explained by anyone so far.


            So there!
            That can never be satisfactorily explained because that is exactly what happens...of course the reactionary torque of an inline tranfers weight to one tire and takes it from the other....the same way a sidewinder does from front to back. I do believe that is what SS and I have been saying all along....well, from the time we decided to post...

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