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Your #1 Tuning Tip - Time To Cough It Up!

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  • #16
    Elmer's glue

    One of my pet peeves is loose fitting body parts, like interiors and headlight covers. When these are loose, they tend to rattle and buzz. Older Fly cars are notorious for this. I subscribe to the theory that anything that makes noise takes energy - energy that could be used to move the car if it weren't making the noise. Besides, all that racket just irritates me. So I like to eliminate these noises when possible. One of the easiest ways I've found to do that is to put a drop of plain old Elmer's white glue in the gaps around these pieces. The Elmer's dries clear, washes off with water if you want to remove it, and is thick enough to fill the gaps that allow the parts to move. I've been able to silence even the noisiest of Fly cars this way, and even if it doesn't make them faster, it does make them more enjoyable to drive.
    Last edited by Zoom Beedo; 02-03-2007, 09:58 PM.

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    • #17
      To ensure I spend more money on cars, and less on guides, I try to use stock parts when ever possible. Most stock guides are really sloppy and rock laterally, fore and aft, as well as vertically which doesn't make for an ideal interface with the slot.

      I shim my guides with Evergreen styrene tube. I cut a slice that's just the right size to limit vertical travel which seems to eliminate all the other axes of play considerably.



      Once I've fitted the piece, I use CA glue to attach it to the shaft of the guide. Sure, you could accomplish much the same thing with a Slot.it screw in guide, but this fix uses less than a penny worth of materials.

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      • #18
        hey race fans , OK I don't have a tip but I do have a question, I know big surprise right ? Anyway I got some 3/32 oillite bushings to put in my cars and thought I would use the tip using glue to take out the slop but was wondering if they fit standard axles or not ? The bushings haven't arrived yet, so I have not started on them yet ! Thanks for any info on -axel compatibility with oillite bushings - Will I need to change the axles also ? Again thanks guys !

        gene4christ
        Last edited by gene4christ; 02-10-2007, 08:53 PM.

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        • #19
          Slot Car Handling

          Slot Car Handling -- Lessons Learned:

          Be sure the guide cannot wobble in the holder. A very slight wobble can be offset by a guide post angled slightly forward at the top.

          True tires; even slight out of round causes vibration and a reduction of acceleration and cornering speed.

          Tires should have rounded outer shoulders to prevent digging in and rolling, and to promote a smooth drift.

          Vibration in the rear axle can emanate from poorly aligned gears. Most self-aligned gears will run at less than optimum mesh; the gears should be set for less sideplay with thrust bearings.

          If a car deslots at the front, add low weight at the front. If the guide is secure, cars usually deslot at the front because they develop too much traction at the rear tires and begin to roll. Weight at the front will keep the car level, and will not add to the tendency of the rear to break loose at the rear, and slide due to centrifugal force.

          A non-tipping front axle and true front tires will provide anti-roll stability for the entire car. A floating front axle promotes roll and hinders cornering ability.

          Handling difficulties caused by vibration appear to rise with track voltage. Vibration limits the increase in speed with increase in voltage. Cutting track voltage increases driveability in the corners, reduces straight line speed, and provides nearly the same lap times as higher voltage. By extension, this applies to motors. A lower torque motor may provide for higher lap speeds than a higher torque motor. This inverse correlation appears marked with motors rated over 135-170 g-cm/12v.

          Overpowering motor torque may be reduced by gearing with lower numerical ratios. For example, a 170 gcm motor will deliver 510 gcm at the rear axle at a gear ratio of 3:1. The same motor will deliver only 425 gcm at 2.5:1. The car will seem easier to drive, and will probably allow lower lap times.

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          • #20
            them loose tyres

            I'm a newbie, and I MAY have this wrong, so you experienced fellas feel free to correct me but;
            A lot of cars come with tyres which are soft enough to "swell" off the rims under free revving. They also slip under load, and/or move in and out of "true" on the rims because either they were "trued" on a less than perfect standard plastic wheel, or because they just move on or off the shoulders a little.

            When I hear a car on a track sounding off balance at the top end speed on the track, and/or "going off-tune" during a race, I am convinced swelling or shifting of the tyres on the rims is one possible cause.

            THEREFORE, I tried this. I smeared silicone sealant - like you use for plastic gutters etc or around wet areas, onto the rims - I haven't found anything more accurate than a finger for this task yet, I made it a mere smear, and made sure that I didn't leave "build-up" in the outer shoulder.
            Then I carefully refitted the tyre.
            Next, I run the motor at low volts and "trued" the tyre very lightly while the silicone is still wet, just to ensure the tyre is fitted evenly, and that there is no "lumpy buildup" on the wheel, caused by the silicone.
            Then I left it to set at least a day with the wheels elevated.
            Now I true the tyres properly.

            I have done it to 2 cars so far. A Ninco BMW Advan, and a Scalextric V8 Supercar - similar to a Nascar.
            Both are now smoother, quieter and faster on Ninco plastic. Haven't had a chance to try on wood yet.

            One thing with this mod is; to undo it, the tyre still peels off easy at a later date, and any residual silicone sealant can be removed from the rims with no damage, just a finger rub and light scrape at most.

            Mark

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            • #21
              hey race fans , I was able to track down a distributor for the rsm tire truer . I don't know where they are located but not in the US I emailed them to try and find out the manufactures web site so I could maybe get a manual or parts list but alas I have not herd from them I do believe I can build one of these things on the milling machine at work OK after work just need a closer look ! this store also sells part for it as well .Anyway if you want the link PM me .

              gene4christ

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              • #22
                Hi Racergene

                The RSM is made in Germany now by Overdrive Slot Service. This is the same company that makes the light kits for slot cars. He has bought the patents and tooling and will be manufacturing the unit on his own. He is way behind schedule with this as new units were supposed to be available in September of last year. I think it will be some time before we see new units available. I, too would like to get my hands on one of these.

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                • #23
                  hey race fan dr vanski , Yep thats the site I found well I was led there by a former distributor from down under forum So He is the manufacturer now then ? thanks that helps

                  gene4christ

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                  • #24
                    I make sure the guide stays squaire with the chassie and still swings freely so the wires don't hang up, and the blade stays steight up and down. a guide that leans in the corner will let the front ride up and deslot. the braids I like to unbraid about the last 1/4 so the wires are lose with a little curl down at the very end. and then like to use a drop of WD40 on the braids.

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                    • #25
                      Get the body as light as the rules allow. I once spent all night gently grinding a shell with my dremel, got it down from 25 grams to 15. May not sound much but it was all weight that sits high up which affects handling. The lighter the body the better it corners.

                      Paul

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                      • #26
                        Lets revive this thread, maybe there are more secrets that are yet to be revealed?

                        Mine is:
                        Using tighter tires on larger rims. Doesnt work for all types i would assume, but SIPT06 on SIPA19 is just right..

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                        • #27
                          I set the guide post with about one or two degrees of rake. The top of the post leans ahead of the bottom of the post. This arrangement mean that the guide acts more like a hook as the car slides out, contacting the slot along the bottom edge of the flag. This can only be done if you are building your own guide mount, although I have bent plastic ones down, if they are wobbly, so the rake compensates for the angle you lose due to a poor fit of guide post in its holder. Cars built like this stay in the slot.

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                          • #28
                            Tightening guide post bearings: I have a few cars which came with very sloppy guide flags. To quickly cure this problem, I just remove the guide from the car; then use a toothpick to paint a couple of coats of CA adhesive followed by a shot of accelerator into the receiver hole the guide came out of. This interface will now be too tight. Open it back up to proper size, a little at a time, by using progressively larger drill bits; starting with a bit smaller than the guide post. Hold the bit in your hand. A power tool is too hard to control without "grabing" and ruining the job. Keep at it until the guide post slips into it's hole and turns freely without wobbeling.

                            I also had some Carrera cars which had really sloppy axles in their brass bushings. The cure in this instance was to simply replace the Carrera axles with Slot.It axles. They fit much better than the ones which came with the car.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Robert Livingston View Post
                              I set the guide post with about one or two degrees of rake. The top of the post leans ahead of the bottom of the post. This arrangement mean that the guide acts more like a hook as the car slides out, contacting the slot along the bottom edge of the flag. This can only be done if you are building your own guide mount, although I have bent plastic ones down, if they are wobbly, so the rake compensates for the angle you lose due to a poor fit of guide post in its holder. Cars built like this stay in the slot.
                              Sounds very interesting Robert, but i dont quite understand. Got any pictures??

                              Thanks..

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                              • #30
                                Imagine a guide that's sloppy in it's holder. The bottom of it would lean back compared to the top when viewed from the side so the front is digging into the track. Robert's idea is to pre-set the guide so wear and tear makes it perfectly flat.

                                Cheers

                                Paul

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