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Your #1 Tuning Tip - Time To Cough It Up!

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  • #31
    I don't just chamfer the outside of my tyres, I also chamfer the inside of them slightly so they slide over the slot easily and don't dig in on the inside

    Good thread by the way, some good tips

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    • #32
      Aha, so in other words.. Just wait till the guide becomes sloppy in its holder, then possibly true it manually or let the wear n tear true for you to accomplish this?

      I see.. A truin i go..

      Originally posted by Sports Racer View Post
      Imagine a guide that's sloppy in it's holder. The bottom of it would lean back compared to the top when viewed from the side so the front is digging into the track. Robert's idea is to pre-set the guide so wear and tear makes it perfectly flat.

      Cheers

      Paul

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      • #33
        I don't just chamfer the outside of my tyres, I also chamfer the inside of them slightly so they slide over the slot easily and don't dig in on the inside.
        You're dead right on this, IMHO, particularly with a raised rail or a solder joint on copper that has created a bump.

        Also, there's a tendency over a long haul (as in proxy racing) for the tires to wear far faster toward the outside edge due to wheelspin under acceleration, I suspect. So I'll always pay attention to rounding the inner shoulders, it really can make a difference.

        Welcome, by the way, hope you enjoy it here.

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        • #34
          wheelspin under acceleration??? What have you been smoking? Wheelspin would wear the tire evenly across the entire surface.

          The reason tires wear more on the outer edge is due to tire distortion under cornering and slight body/chassis roll through corners. Have a look at tire wear on a car that has the front wheels firmly on the track (no play in the axle mounts) compared to a car that has the front wheels off the track. The former will have rear tire wear more even across it's surface. The latter will have more wear on the outer edges of the rear tire. This is because the car "tips" through a corner and the front wheels limit how much it tips. The more tip the more the rear tires wear to match the angle of tip.

          That's why I build my cars so the front wheels just touch the track.

          Cheers

          Paul

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          • #35
            Wheelspin would wear the tire evenly across the entire surface.
            A remarkable supposition, especially when you consider that launch is much more efficient when the car is pointed down a straight, instead of coming out of a turn.

            Still, I'm sure you know best.

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            • #36
              front end planted

              A number of responses have touched upon control of the front end. Some times the excellent Shoreline front axle holders etal are precluded by the race rules. Also there is a limity on how many cars need to be "racing" level of performence.

              For getting more control of Scaley cars I have found adjusting the braids can make a big difference. The aim is to get the front wheels to just touch th track. Scaley in their infinate wisdom thread the braid through the guide flag and create two ends. The front part sits over the rear part which is folded forward. Their is usually an indentation on the guide plate to allow the folded forward part of th braid to rest. I find the car sits closer to the track if the raer braid is bent back creating two contact ends. Am not sure if this does creat a better contact. The braid now looks like a SCX/Carrera one. This can be coupled with judicious filing of the lower flat part of the guide flag to bring the car down. This works best on the trans am style Scaley guide system.

              The car is lower at minimal additional cost and appears to handle better than it peers.

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              • #37
                Guides are a good place to tweak RTR cars to go faster. On the Scalextric guides, I do what Dansula says, but I also re-thread the braid so it is one long pigtail rather than two short pigtails. The downward pressure of a longer braid is less than two shorter braids. Results is the same electrical contact, but less spring pressure pushing upward on the front end, so you get less front end bounce, and you reduce or eliminate front end de-slots.

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                • #38
                  for me it's got to be a smooth drive train. running in the gear's and sometimes the axle bearing's with toothpaste or valve grinding compound is one trick i do. a noisy drive train often means wasted energy. another is to balance tire's and axle setup's with hot glue .

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                  • #39
                    another is to balance tire's and axle setup's with hot glue
                    Care to explain your technique? Sounds interesting.

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                    • #40
                      I'm with WetCoast. Maybe I'm not understanding the syntax correctly or something, but I'm especially curious about balancing tires with hot glue...

                      Greg

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                      • #41
                        sorry guy's im new to the board. the hot glue trick is something i learned from r/c cars. basicly what i do is static balance my wheel and gear axle setup and if it's way off i put small drop's of hot glue on the back of the wheel rim's. then fine tune by either shaving off bit's of the glue or adding more. i mark all part's then assemble in the car before truing tire's.
                        i usauly place the wheel set screw's 180 degree's apart and the gear set screw somewhere in between them.i had some car's hop badly at high speed and thought it was out of round tire's, but it was a badly out of balance set up.
                        mark

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Robert Livingston View Post
                          Guides are a good place to tweak RTR cars to go faster. On the Scalextric guides, I do what Dansula says, but I also re-thread the braid so it is one long pigtail rather than two short pigtails. The downward pressure of a longer braid is less than two shorter braids. Results is the same electrical contact, but less spring pressure pushing upward on the front end, so you get less front end bounce, and you reduce or eliminate front end de-slots.

                          Robert in my haste to post I left this bit out. As an alternative the rear most braid can some times be trimed with scizzors to have only one touching. This stops there being any overlap between the front and rear braid which leads to a higher ride height. The re-position runs the potential down sides of the rear end not being secured strongly in the guide plate and so to do may be the little tuft sticking proud of the guide plate can't be bent back cos it is too short, leading to a higher ride height. MAYBE??? I am saying this and will have to give it a try. On balence the "re-position" the braid will probably be best.

                          One key point to take home when racing RTR cars "one design" with minimal modifications to them each tiny modification can make a huge difference in the handling of the car. This is most noticable in that fraction more top speed, predictable handling and how forgiving the car is to drive compared to its peers. This all leads to some very fun and competitive racing.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by synchro View Post
                            sorry guy's im new to the board. the hot glue trick is something i learned from r/c cars. basicly what i do is static balance my wheel and gear axle setup and if it's way off i put small drop's of hot glue on the back of the wheel rim's. then fine tune by either shaving off bit's of the glue or adding more. i mark all part's then assemble in the car before truing tire's.
                            i usauly place the wheel set screw's 180 degree's apart and the gear set screw somewhere in between them.i had some car's hop badly at high speed and thought it was out of round tire's, but it was a badly out of balance set up.
                            mark
                            Yeah, that makes sense. You're including the tires while you are static balancing the whole assembly. For some reason I had this thought that you were balancing the tires independently (off the wheels) My fault for the mis-interpretation.

                            Greg

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                            • #44
                              A friend tried the wheel balancing trick for a while but eventually gave up, the effort was never justified in race results. I can understand doing it to R/C wheels and tires due to their larger diameter. Have you found that it makes a difference when racing?

                              Someone's touched on chamfering the outside AND inside edges of tires - good.

                              Reducing the contact patch of front wheels has been written about - good.

                              Wet disagrees with my wheelspin theory - good.

                              To get the best out of my cars I spend a lot of time setting up the front end. Making sure that the front tires are trued, ride height set and no play in the front axle (all 3 dimensions - up/down fore/aft and left/right). I don't set it tight as they need to spin freely but I try to get all the play out.

                              Further advances can be gained by reducing the contact patch (true the tires so only the outer edge touches the track ie a slight chamfer across the whole surface. Also you can superglue the entire surface so the tires don't grip and then true them very lightly again.

                              I setup the front tires so they just touch the ground on most of my cars but occasionally I get one that works better with the tires in the air. Just goes to show that not all cars respond in the same way.

                              Cheers

                              Paul

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                well i only use wheel balancing on car's that i found had a problem, basicly if you hold the rear of a car up and apply throttle you can hear and feel wheel hop . i would say very few car's will do this and i dont waste time balancing every car or wheel . some time's this is caused by loose or worn bushing's or bearing's also. you are basicly looking and feeling for a wobble and it's cause. when i use a new setup a quick roll on a static balancer will tell you if you have a problem. i use an old double razor blade static balancer for this. most of my experience has been with vintage and hard body slot car's on a 125 foot hill climb who's longest strait was 25 feet. at the speed's you could reach wheel balance did come into play.
                                sorry if im being long winded, just wanted to try and explain.

                                mark

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