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Your #1 Tuning Tip - Time To Cough It Up!

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  • #46
    Thanks Mark, makes perfect sense, now I'll have to test all my cars. Very simple method you've developed. I thought I'd have to do the double razor blade treatment but never thought of just lifting the rear up and checking for vibration.

    Thanks for the tip.

    Paul

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    • #47
      Originally posted by synchro View Post
      ... i use an old double razor blade static balancer for this
      mark
      Sounds interesting. How does it work?


      kanagom aka hellrazor

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      • #48
        Glue two razor blades to a wooden block, about 40mm apart with the edges pointed straight up so the sharp edges are at the top. Make sure they are perfectly parallel and level so when you put an axle across them the axle (with wheels, gear and tires) can roll on the blade edge. Put the axle assembly on and when it stops rolling put a mark on the side of the tire, at it's highest point. Do it a couple of times and if it always settles with the mark at the top it shows where you need to add weight. Add weight and repeat until you get the axle assembly balanced.

        Mark both wheels and gear with a marking pen or white-out so you know exactly how they fit in relation to themselves when you have to put the axle assembly back in your car.

        If you're really serious (or insane) fit one wheel to the axle and balance it. Remove it and then do the same with the gear. Remove it and do the other wheel.

        Yes it's a lot of work but if your rear end is seriously out of balance to start with it can make a difference.

        Cheers

        Paul
        Last edited by Sports Racer; 02-16-2008, 04:15 PM.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Sports Racer View Post
          ... Yes it's a lot of work but if your rear end is seriously out of balance to start with it can make a difference.
          That's a pretty involved trick! Thanks for the explanation, Paul.



          Jan

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          • #50
            #1. before making any change to a car run it for a few hundred laps. see this way the driver has time to adapt to the car. now said driver has a base from which to judge the changes.

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            • #51
              thank's paul,couldnt have said it better myself ! the set up i use was made in 60's and has an aluminum channel with two razor blade's on the side's. dont remember who made it and after moving stuff around cant find it !

              mark

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              • #52
                Something I'm having a bit of success with is modifying bodies so they only have 2 mounting posts to screw the chassis on, one at the front and one at the back. With only 2 mounting posts the body can easily rock from side to side when the screws are set a bit loose. This allows a little bit of weight transfer and additional downforce on the outer wheels (where you need it most).

                Seems to work OK on non-podded cars. Haven't tried a podded chassis yet.

                Cheers

                Paul

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                • #53
                  It's not really a tuning tip (tried them all) but a maintenance tip that I've been having good luck with lately in the heat of battle. Been cleaning my tires with a "lint roller", it's quick, cheap, thorough and can be carried to the track in the car box. Works on rubber and foam tires too.

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                  • #54
                    Try fitting a Slot-It Flat 6 motor instead of the normal boxer motors in your chassis of choice. Because it's slimmer you can fit a nice slice of lead under the motor - right where it does the most good.

                    Cheers

                    Paul

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                    • #55
                      Motor trick:

                      Some motors, especially Scalextrics and not so much the Slot.its, respond to the motor tabs being adjusted up or flat. LIGHTLY (to avoid breaking) move them up or down to adjust the brushes pressure against the comm and either tach it or listen for the rpm change. When you find the spot(it could be factory), hot glue it to keep it set. Works for me so far.

                      Braids:

                      Keep them as clean as possible from carbon build up and I always put my motor lead side to the braid. Alot of power loss is wasted in that area. Also make sure that the guide makes adequate contact to the track by checking power to the motor via the guide/motor leads then the same voltage directly to the motor. If you have a rpm drop, then you have a problem.

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                      • #56
                        Holy Cow!

                        I just lube it, discard the magnet, run 50 laps or so then start adding weight (clay) as needed.

                        No wonder my cars suck compared to the veterans.

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                        • #57
                          How could I possibly lose now...

                          ....hmmm, I may be a newbie, but it seems to me that if I just apply ALL the aforementioned tips, to each of my cars, I'll never lose again!

                          Thanks for sharing all your BEST secrets and tricks!



                          David

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                          • #58
                            The best tip ever, and I can't stress it enough, is to TEST YOUR CARS. Every race and proxy that I've entered has shown that the more I test and tweak the car the better it goes in the race.

                            Cheers

                            Paul

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                            • #59
                              Motor break in: Remove the motor - Dose with Voodoo juice and run it up on the bench for a minute or so. Flush it throughly with Power Shot motor cleaner and let it dry. Repeat.
                              I keep a good motor on the bench to compare the new motor to. Just listen to compare. You'll be able to hear if the new one is a dog or a runner.

                              leejax - found that tab thing to help sometimes. Thanks.

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                              • #60
                                I always made sure that my tires where trued.

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