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Wheel & Tire Size - Frequently Asked Questions

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  • Wheel & Tire Size - Frequently Asked Questions

    Wheel size is a question that comes up all the time, and the bright idea of introducing a Stuck Thread in this Forum has been brought up.


    I'm going to get the ball rolling by importing a Post of Robert's from a 1/32 Thread.

  • RichD
    replied
    1:1 wheels are actually larger in diameter than the nominal size. The 18 inch wheels on the front of my Corvette are 19.5 inches, in 1:32 scale that would be 0.609 inches or 15.478mm.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevan
    replied
    Whilst looking for tyre size info google pointed me here and it's full of wrong information.

    An 18" wheel scaled down is 14.3mm
    A 16" wheel scaled down is 12.7mm
    Circumference is Pi x D or 2 x Pi x r

    Simple maths easily googled

    Leave a comment:


  • glp
    replied
    I'm 35. That could be the problem!

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Livingston
    replied
    Funny thing about math. I never understood a word of it until I got well into my 40's, and started working with engineering concepts, based on physics.

    Leave a comment:


  • glp
    replied
    Bob, I am sorry. I was giving the area of a circle. You are right!

    Leave a comment:


  • glp
    replied
    Do a google search

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Livingston
    replied
    Formula for circumference cannot, by definition, contain a squared term. If it did, the units would be squared, and would therefore be appropriate only for area. Are we talking about the same thing?

    Leave a comment:


  • glp
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert Livingston View Post
    If you guys actually believe there is a squared term in a linear measurement, I have a bridge in Brooklyn I'd like to sell.
    Sorry but, that is the formula! P=Isquared x R is another squared formula
    Last edited by glp; 11-11-2010, 08:09 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Livingston
    replied
    If you guys actually believe there is a squared term in a linear measurement, I have a bridge in Brooklyn I'd like to sell.

    Leave a comment:


  • mandoman
    replied
    Originally posted by glp View Post
    C=3.14 x Rsquared
    Si if R=4, it goes like this
    3.14(4x4)=3.14 x 16=50.24
    that's how I remember it

    NERD! LOL!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • glp
    replied
    C=3.14 x Rsquared
    Si if R=4, it goes like this
    3.14(4x4)=3.14 x 16=50.24
    that's how I remember it

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Livingston
    replied
    Originally posted by lindseyangell View Post
    The circumference is two times PI, times the (Radius Squared) [44/7 * (Radius Squared)]
    Oops! That formula will not give you the circumference of the tire, but it will give you the area of the side view of the tire and wheel. I don't think you'll ever need to know the area of the side of the tire and wheel.

    Multiply the radius times two (or the diameter) times Pi, to obtain the circumference. This is the "roll-out" distance of one complete revolution of the tire.

    Leave a comment:


  • glp
    replied
    Originally posted by lindseyangell View Post
    The height of a tire is the diameter of the tire.
    The radius of the tire is half of the diameter.
    The circumference is two times PI, times the (Radius Squared) [44/7 * (Radius Squared)]

    You will find that Slot Car Corner gives you the free download for tires and they will have it listed and then if you look on the chart you may have an option for smaller of larger Diameters (given in both Inches and Millimeters).

    Slot Car Corner also has an assortment of tires for all of their wheels in the list as well. Going to a lower profile tire (Smaller diameter) will get the chassis lower to the track, a taller profile (a larger diameter) will increase the distance from the track and BOTH will affect the handling of your car. Sometimes you will find that even going with their 8mm wide wheels all teh way around will give you better performance on the track as opposed to increasing the width to 10 or 11mm width on the rear wheels. Just like in real life in real tires an 8" width Slick will spin and get you faster times than a 12" slick on the same car because it has to much traction...

    Once you find the right wheel size then you can really adjust the height and it is fun to see how much difference the car drives. Once you find the right tire then you can glue it and true it even round off the edges and you have the tire situation under control.

    If you are running on wood tracks some guys will tell you ONLY URETHANES, some people only want Silicones and then again some people only want you to use the rubber tires..I suppose this is true with the Plastic tracks but I wouldn't know because I only hae wooden tracks available at 400 mile round trip intervals...SO, I use Urethane as that is all that they want me to use.

    Hope this helps you some...
    When I drag raced, it was all about getting traction. I knew when I didn't hook up as soon as I launched. Or knew I was going to have a slow time when my tires were spinning half way through second gear. If you need to spin your tires to get faster ET's, the tourque converter or launch method is to blame.

    Leave a comment:


  • mandoman
    replied
    [quote=lindseyangell;449283]The height of a tire is the diameter of the tire.
    The radius of the tire is half of the diameter.
    The circumference is two times PI, times the (Radius Squared) [44/7 * (Radius Squared)][quote]

    [quote=Hkyfanatic;]The distance around the tire = circumference which is 3.1416 x height or diameter.[quote]

    Those mathematical measurements sound like a distasteful reminder of the far distant past, LOL.
    That's right, I'm a mathematical idiot, but I understood the rest of your posts well enough that I think I get the gist. Thanks, because any info helps. I've been trying to write down some of these suggestions, so I can make myself a comprehensive guide. It may be impossible.

    SCC's chart, and products, are the best I have found, and I do believe that their tires have a far more visible difference in tire thickness than most other tires available, but the Super Tires don't work the best on all of our tracks. Urethane is best for the wood routed track, and some kind of silicone, like Indy grips, seem to work best on one of the magnetic plastic tracks, while the other mag. track is wood, and Super Tires are by far the best there. I've never tried the Yellow Dogs. Are they a good Urethane?
    Last edited by mandoman; 11-26-2010, 08:15 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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