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  • Routing Guide

    On another BB someone was asking about the Lexan guide that Devis Designs took over from Luf. I understand that someone else will now be taking that over that business, but I was not able to find a reference.

  • #2
    I have an inside man with the info. ;-)

    Production will resume within the next month, hopefully.

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    • #3
      Subscribed!

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      • #4
        I'm new here, but I have found and plan to use this....
        Last edited by Wet Coast Racer; 06-14-2018, 04:39 PM. Reason: Removing Amazon link per Rule 13

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        • #5
          You're likely to create trouble for yourself...

          If you use a flexible guide to rout a concave curve, you'll find that any deviation from a smooth, round curve will be magnified as you rout successive slots, moving towards the center of the curve, if you use each slot as a guide for the next. In a tight, hairpin curve things can get very ugly.

          You can avoid this by starting with the tightest radius slot and working outward, but this may require you to match up the slots of curves with those of straights. This is a whole lot harder than it looks, especially if you are routing 1/16" wide slots for an HO track. If you are off by only 1/64th of an inch (0.016") you'll have a step in the slot quite large enough to catch a guide pin. The common solution to this is to sand the walls of the slot to smooth out the step.

          And if you try to match up one curve to another curve in the opposite direction ('esses') it gets even trickier. Take my word for it.

          When creating templates I always recommend using a compass for concave curves. A compass will give you a smooth enough concave curve that you can use one slot as the template for the next.

          Convex curves are much more forgiving. You can even hand-shape them. I have used a hand-held belt sander to shape convex curves on a template with excellent results.

          Ed Bianchi
          Last edited by Wet Coast Racer; 06-14-2018, 04:40 PM. Reason: See above edit. Please 'Report Post' on this stuff instead of responding to it, thanks.

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          • #6
            I used high pressure stiff air line as a guide when building my track, started on the inside of each corner and worked out doing all the corners first then routed the straights using the corners as the start and finishing points. IMO it is the best method as IF you have a problem on any corner it is easier to adjust for the errior.

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            • #7
              Hi Phil, sounds like a good trick.

              Meanwhile, I'll just comment that I've been pleased to see how the ownership of Luf's routing guide concept was successfully transferred to another genuine slot hobbyist (Bibbster & Co) and is now going to transfer to another genuine slot hobbyist (MrFlippant will keep us informed).

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              • #8
                I brought a lenght of Lexan from a local plastic suppier, drilled all the holes but found it would not bend sharp enough for my rally track,that is why I looked around and found the pressure hose, drilled and nailed it could be bent for very sharp corners.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by HO RacePro View Post
                  You're likely to create trouble for yourself...

                  If you use a flexible guide to rout a concave curve, you'll find that any deviation from a smooth, round curve will be magnified as you rout successive slots, moving towards the center of the curve, if you use each slot as a guide for the next. In a tight, hairpin curve things can get very ugly.

                  You can avoid this by starting with the tightest radius slot and working outward, but this may require you to match up the slots of curves with those of straights. This is a whole lot harder than it looks, especially if you are routing 1/16" wide slots for an HO track. If you are off by only 1/64th of an inch (0.016") you'll have a step in the slot quite large enough to catch a guide pin. The common solution to this is to sand the walls of the slot to smooth out the step.

                  And if you try to match up one curve to another curve in the opposite direction ('esses') it gets even trickier. Take my word for it.

                  When creating templates I always recommend using a compass for concave curves. A compass will give you a smooth enough concave curve that you can use one slot as the template for the next.

                  Convex curves are much more forgiving. You can even hand-shape them. I have used a hand-held belt sander to shape convex curves on a template with excellent results.

                  Ed Bianchi



                  I plan on building "racing line" lanes with a couple lane changers. wouldn't that remove the requirement to keep the lanes perfect width apart? Like I've said, I'm a newby and was thinking that it would be easier to use the guide to "freehand" the lanes/lines. any ideas suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
                  w

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                  • #10
                    W, as a former routed track builder and former manufacturer of the lexan routing strip mentioned above a few times, yes, racing lines would remove the parallel spacing in some parts of your proposed track build, however, you will want to have parallel lanes in some areas. One of the keys to a fun and enjoyable track is flow. If all lanes of your track are coming together in lots of places the joy will be gone as there will inevitably be contact between cars resulting in deslots. That's fine for a demolition derby, not so much for a racing experience.

                    My suggestion on your proposed guide for routing would be to not use it. It is very short and can result in jagged slots where the ends meet as you are constantly having to stop your router, move the strip, and route again. Wait for MrFlippant (Greg) to get the routing kits up and going on his end and buy one of those. You won't be disappointed. His routing strip is 8' long and makes for a much better option, and it will be priced right as well.

                    Happy to discuss further if you'd like, just shoot me a PM.

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                    • #11
                      The "strip" I got from Luf way back when was singularly responsible for creating that flowing, apex-clipping racing line that makes the track so fun to drive. Glad to hear the legacy lives on!

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                      • #12
                        Glad to hear from you again here on SCI, Natalie.

                        This place needs more women of your gender, I often think.

                        Also, isn't it time you routed another track?

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                        • #13
                          Is anyone is selling the lexan routing strip these days?

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                          • #14
                            Yes, Mr. Flippant is selling them now. He took over making all of the routing stuff that OLDSLOTRACER and DEVIS 3D were doing. I know the info is on HRW. It's probably on SCI too but I don't know where. He will probably see your post or you could PM him.

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                            • #15
                              Yep. I've got stock and ready to ship. You can find my ads on the Panjo board, though I guess I'll have to make sure that's still linked here...
                              So yeah, PM me, and I'll send you a price list and/or links.

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