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  #1  
Old 04-07-2008, 07:30 PM
slotnroc slotnroc is offline
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Default Track underlayment

I hope this can be answered quickly so I can get on with
my layout. I have 1/2'' carpet pad that is under my track
which is the scx version. I found that with the 1/2'' pad
and 1/4'' cork the track apron will be level. I want to know
what opinions you guys have about the use of a good
solid quality pad. I'm concerned about the fire retardent qualities
if their is such a thing. Maybe I should'nt feel concerned. Sorry
I'm limited on space and went with the 1/43 scale sets.
I also plan to landscape and build all my track scenery. I have
studied the forums here and else where and the ideas I've
gotten are in a looseleaf notebook soon to be used. Thanks everyone
for all you share out there. I have been around plaster and paint work
and love the idea of minute detail as well. Any help will be greatfully
acknowledged and I will answer my mail faithfully.
Thank you slotters and hobbyists.
SlotNRoc
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  #2  
Old 04-08-2008, 06:55 AM
TCEdMon TCEdMon is offline
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Is underlayment really needed?

I知 about to put together a SCX analog track, thought I would lay it out on plywood which I will prime using white paint then trace the track outline, take up the track tape/mask the track area, then paint the plywood brown and then sprinkle the grass stuff over it several times and use the 50-50 glue water mixer to seal the grass down. Pull up the tape lay the track back down and then build up around it to form hills, banks etc.

I知 really new to this stuff; any help would be very much appreciated.
Thanks
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  #3  
Old 04-08-2008, 07:25 AM
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Most people feel the underlayment really reduces track noise.

I remember from my model R.R days that this is true. This weekend I went to Home D. and found that they carry Homasote, a pressed paper board ,4'x8' 1/2" thick for about $25.00.
It is a natural grey color, and holds glue and scenery well.

Steve C

Last edited by Steve C; 04-08-2008 at 07:28 AM.
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  #4  
Old 04-08-2008, 10:53 AM
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Hollow plastic track on a hard surface tends to be noisy.

I've used homasote on top of wood for movable HO tracks; I screw the plastic track to the wood through the homasote. The result is pretty light and stiff, and the track wiring can be concealed between the wood and homasote. I usually use carpet as an underlay for 1/32.

IMO , the natural homasote texture painted grass colors is a reasonable groundcover by itself. You can easily stick vegetation into it and add more textures.

Last edited by thatguy01; 04-08-2008 at 10:57 AM.
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  #5  
Old 04-08-2008, 02:29 PM
TCEdMon TCEdMon is offline
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Should I use 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 inch plywood under the ス inch Homasote product?
I checked out the Homasote website, they show an application for RR hobbyists.

I would like the road surface to be flush with the finished grass and layout so I will have to build up the area on either side of my track, thought I would use some type of latex wall board compound and feather it out/down as needed.

Ya値l think latex compound would be a little flexible; I would like to be able to move my table around my garage using casters on the legs?
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  #6  
Old 04-08-2008, 03:33 PM
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I think rule of thumb should be use the thickest plywood you can if weight is not a problem. With a thinner board I would add a couple more cross beams underneath for support. (moving around might require the thicker board)

If humidity is a problem in the garage and you will not be running the wires between the wood and Homasote I would glue it right to the plywood (remember Homasote is basically paper). You can use just about any type of white or wood glue. Apply liberally and spread. Place weights on until dry then paint.

Steve C

Last edited by Steve C; 04-10-2008 at 04:58 AM.
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  #7  
Old 04-08-2008, 06:33 PM
slotnroc slotnroc is offline
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Default underlayment

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCEdMon View Post
Is underlayment really needed?

I知 about to put together a SCX analog track, thought I would lay it out on plywood which I will prime using white paint then trace the track outline, take up the track tape/mask the track area, then paint the plywood brown and then sprinkle the grass stuff over it several times and use the 50-50 glue water mixer to seal the grass down. Pull up the tape lay the track back down and then build up around it to form hills, banks etc.

I知 really new to this stuff; any help would be very much appreciated.
Thanks
Is the plywood sanded or rough?
You can pick a primer and have it tinted lightly, just
ask the shop mgr which primers can take tint.
Usually 2 coats is good and will help as a sealant
on that plywood. I used some kind of 1/2'' versaboard
and it was sanded and I applied some oil hunter green.
I new that my scenery would be mobile and I will cover
the green with diffrent textures as well as color later.
SlotNRoc
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  #8  
Old 04-08-2008, 06:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCEdMon View Post
Should I use 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 inch plywood under the ス inch Homasote product?
I checked out the Homasote website, they show an application for RR hobbyists.
You will have the best results using 3/8" plywood under 5/16" Homasote . This will give you a strong foudation without being overly thick.
Myself I would only go to that much trouble if I was building an open gridwork layout.


Tom
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  #9  
Old 04-08-2008, 07:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve C View Post
Ignore that R.R.---As you can see using the homasote will enable you to add many scenic items. If you want to add water, all you have to do is cut away the homasote, seal with papiermache, paint blue and poor some epoxy.
Steve C
You shouldn't paint the bottom of lakes, rivers, etc. Blue, the blue you see when looking at the ocean is a reflection of the sky. To paint water effects: start at the edge with a light to medium earth color, and then work toward the center(deepest part) with ever darker shades of green/olive blending each darker shade with the lighter shade you did before it to give the feeling of depth to the water. For shallower water use lighter colors. for very deep water the center most(deepest area) should be almost black. For very clear shallow water use only earth tones, and add details to the bed of the water feature like rocks and dead logs.
Insulation foam board makes a much better base for scenery than Homasote does. Homasote is really only good for road bed. Model RRs use it for road bed because it dampens sound, and because it is easy to shape, and to drive scale rail spikes into.


Tom
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  #10  
Old 04-09-2008, 06:07 AM
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Not sure if this came up already but cutting homasote can be a pain. If you use a power saw, make sure you do it outside, there's all sorts of dust. If you use a knife, make sure you get lots of spare blades, homasote is really rough on knife blades. Oh, and because homasote is basically paper, make sure you seal it on all sides, it absorbs moisture.

Randy
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