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What are your ride height rules?

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  • What are your ride height rules?

    When setting up my car for The Chicago 24, I noticed that with the 17mm handout tires we were using, my car had well over 1/16th inch clearance in the rear. That's considered very high in the 1/24th scale world, particularly when running on a wood routed flat track, w/o any banking. The norm would be 1/32nd clearance in the rear on that sort of track.

    What rules do your clubs have with respect to ride height. Do you have an explicit ground clearance spec...and how does that differ between wood routed tracks vs plastic tracks?

    Thanks,
    Jeff

  • #2
    Wood track. All four tires must touch the track. The body or chassis can not touch the track when you push down on corners or sides of the car.

    Comment


    • #3
      For 1/32 current-era proxy racing in the RAA, we long ago adopted a ground clearance rule that states that the car cannot drag on the track; and if it does, the individual track owner can decide to sideline a car if he or she feels the car may damage the track (such as shorting the power or tearing up braid/tape). The track owner can run the dragging cars if it is felt not to be a problem for the track.

      For 1960's era GT, Sports and F1 proxy competition in the IPS and the VRAA, where the real cars had 5-6" clearance in full size, we use 2 scale inches (1/16") mandatory minimum clearance. This allows cars to run with standard motors, without too much design difficulty.

      The Can Am proxy series has a .047" clearance minimum (1.5mm), for cars of the 1960's and early 1970's.

      None of the proxy series I know of require all four wheels to touch and roll; in general it has been found that cars handle better when they do, so, no need for a rule. All these proxies are no-mag, on wood and plastic track.
      Last edited by Robert Livingston; 03-14-2010, 04:36 PM.

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      • #4
        Hi Jeff,

        For the Shoreline club, we do not have a ground clearance rule. For both wood and plastic, I try to get the chassis as low as possible without dragging. Sometimes thats hard to do on a plastic track no matter how much clearance you have. We really didn't have much of a choice at Chicago because we needed one tire to fit all cars (including the angle winder Ninco) so we needed a bigger tire. If you wanted to lower the car, you can try an offset pod and a lower diameter tire. Slot Car Corner has a lower profile .792 tire for the LMP rim.

        Mike

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        • #5
          Jeff,

          Our series races don't have height restrictions either, but rather we have a maximum magnetic effect reading measured by a Magnet Marshal. Our series usually consist of spec everything: axles, wheels, tires, motor, car, chassis, etc. With that said, ride heights are pretty even at the start with new tires. As the season progresses and the tires wear, the cars are placed on the scale to see what the motor's magnetic effect is.

          For example, our current series is using NINCO Lamborghini Gallardos. With SCC Superwheels and PRS 20.5x11.5 tire, the NC5 in this specific chassis setup should not pull above 9grams of magnetic downforce. As soon as the car crosses the 11gram mark, the tires are to be replaced because usually this is when the motor starts dragging the track.

          Just another way of enforcing ride heights - this works well on plastic tracks, but for wood tracks and long lasting silicone tires, an actual minimum ride height measurement would be ideal.

          Mark

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          • #6
            We have a 3/64" clearance rule. It was terribly important when we ran a lot of Mag, but now that we are mostly no-mag and have downforce limits (even in no mag we limit motor df to 25g) it's not quite as important. Almost all our tracks are wood with magna braid.

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            • #7
              since we are on the ride height subject, how do you guys actually adjust the ride height? Does mostly everyone who sets up a car for a proxy or a competition use an aftermarket chassis like the HRS that allows ride height adjustment?

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              • #8
                Ride Height

                We are adjusting our ride heights with tire & wheel size combination. We are using Super Tires & Yellow Dogs because there are a variety of tire heights. The only problem many of us are encountering is the fragile Ninco Prorace wheels that bend very easy at the hub. I've gone through 5 prs. and I don't think I am buying Prorace wheels from Ninco. Any suggestions for a durable, tough, & race proven wheels?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Profoxcg View Post
                  since we are on the ride height subject, how do you guys actually adjust the ride height? Does mostly everyone who sets up a car for a proxy or a competition use an aftermarket chassis like the HRS that allows ride height adjustment?
                  I just buy oversized tyres and buff them down to achieve the required ride height. Then choose the appropriate gear ratio so that you get your desired roll out. Alternatively companies like slotit MB slot etc make rims in different diameters, just choose one to suit. The front of the car I usually just pack with washers under the guide if its too low. Usually ride height is between 1.2mm (0.047") and 1.6mm (0.062"). Really depends on whos organising the event and how much of a safety margin they want cars to have so that they dont scrape on the track.

                  cheers
                  rick1776

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                  • #10
                    No minimum ride height here. My club runs on Ninco track, so it is self-regulating. Make your car too low -> the bumps catch you out.

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                    • #11
                      keneohekane, Slot Car Corner sells Super Wheels plus two different styles of C.B. Design wheels. In addition there are good wheels from Slot.it and BWA that are not going to bend in a crash.

                      NSR Mosler with C.B. Design wheels


                      Mosler with C.B. Design LMP wheels


                      Lister Storm with Super Wheels

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                      • #12
                        Rich,

                        Are those foam rubber tires on the back of your Mosler?

                        - Jeff

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It sounds like folks adjust ride height through their choice of wheels and tires.

                          At the 24, I was considering adding spacers between the motor pod and chassis, dropping the chassis 1/16th inch (with it's associated lead weights) lower to the track. While that wouldn't have dropped the CG of the motor pod, I then would have been able to glue a strip of 1/16" brass to the bottom of the motor pod, level with the bottom of the now-lowered chassis...thus lowering the CG of the pod as well. None of this would have been legal under the rules of that race but it did spur some product ideas.

                          Would folks be interested in an aftermarket brass weight, shaped to fit the bottom of a motor pod that could be glued to its bottom? I'm also considering making one in steel for for magnet racing...not to increase down force, but to spread the magnetic field out (particularly with angle winder pods) and reduce the sudden breakaway.

                          - Jeff

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                          • #14
                            Rich,

                            Are those foam rubber tires on the back of your Mosler?
                            Knowing Rich, I'll bet those are 1425 Supertires (silicones) on the rear of the Mosler.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JayGee View Post
                              It sounds like folks adjust ride height through their choice of wheels and tires.

                              At the 24, I was considering adding spacers between the motor pod and chassis, dropping the chassis 1/16th inch (with it's associated lead weights) lower to the track. While that wouldn't have dropped the CG of the motor pod, I then would have been able to glue a strip of 1/16" brass to the bottom of the motor pod, level with the bottom of the now-lowered chassis...thus lowering the CG of the pod as well. None of this would have been legal under the rules of that race but it did spur some product ideas.


                              - Jeff
                              Hi Jeff, you need to be very careful doing this. In most cases, there is very little room in the fender wells for the tires. These cars need the pods to float so it is very easy to have a tire rub and any form of rub will ruin the handling of a car. Start raising the pod up and you will have all sorts of problems. I would go for an offset pod with lower profile tires if you wanted to get a lower CG.

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