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3D printed Chaparral 2J

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  • #16
    Originally posted by sascws90 View Post
    Is there a 2D in the makings?????
    Nope - only 3D....... ~ get it? Ahhhhhhh anyway.....

    Well... there are cars that haven't been done in 1/32 that I'm interested in.....

    I will flat out say I'm doing Le Monstre (was done in resin).... That's just for kicks really.....
    I have a list - but how fast I drill through that list is dependent on a few factors...

    I know I need to get through the list quick because my decal guy is like 102 and tells me every time I see him he is ready to quit.....

    Next car is a secret of course... should Be out around thanksgiving....

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    • #17
      Whoa ! This could be a Paradigm Shift !!!

      Originally posted by Changing Gearz View Post
      That's a very good point!
      The body is constructed from a different method than the chassis.... The chassis is done at shapeways.... So shapeways is basically a laser that shoots into a bed of plastic powder... It is melting tiny balls of plastic together - so of course there is trapped air, a bumpy finish..... And painting that part is extremely difficult.... Very fine detail gets lost.... I have seen people doing bodies - but they take them and cast them for resin bodies etc....
      Plus shapeways runs the mail order service where my chassis can be purchased etc.... So if you have seen a shapeways product - the body is nothing like that....

      The body is done through a completely different process.... There is still a laser - but it shoots into a bath of liquid resin.... Being liquid - it doesn't trap air and can capture extremely fine detail. Once it's printed - it cured under a uv light..... For 3D printing - it's as cutting edge as it gets. The underside surface isn't perfect - because the printer builds a lattice support structure as it moves up - but the top side or "A" surface looks just like a typical injected molded part... The material is high impact ABS - I would hate to see one go on the floor - but it should survive without cracking or chipping out material.

      The problem with all 3d printing in detail - is the layering.... As the model builds upward - any surface that curves as it goes up is built in very thin layers so you can see some ridges..... So again - this printer is the latest greatest gadget on the market.....has the finest micron resolution as it gets..... When you look at the raw part - that curved surface seems dull - the layering is super small....Etc.... I washed the part and hit it with one coat of primer.... I could see 2 ridges holding it 4 inches away.... My "finished" prototype took under an hour to finish with paint and decals.... An average modeler will not sink much time into the body to finish...

      There is a team of "experts" behind this thing.... I don't understand half the stuff they are telling me, but it's at a level of quality that is second to none - it's made with the latest technology.... I wouldn't have done it otherwise.... Who needs that kind of grief!

      And yes - I would agree that it is ugly.... Yet so beautiful at the same time.... It's iconic and revolutionary in so many ways - from the godfather of ground effects..... have a happy 4th!

      If this method is ultimately adopted by the major (I hate to say it) "Toy" companies, Hornby , Carrera , and smaller ones like Slot.it ...This technology may serve to end all discussion that models cannot /will not be made due to high tooling costs ...

      With this "3D Business", there is apparently no high cost of injected molded tooling, that is specific to a particular car body. I'm sure the "3D" hardware, software and all the stuff involved is not cheap either, but apparently, once the investment is made, it only involves software drawing changes (again, not costless) to make an entirely different model. No tooling cost to amortize.

      I'm thinking , that with this process (about which I know NOTHING) it may be possible to "amortize" the "tooling costs" (the 3D printer , software and stuff) over ALL the models one produces. Not just a particular model.

      No "assumptions" about the number of liveries a model has to be made in.
      No "bans" on one off's or limited prototypes ... (like a 1/24 scale Ford MK IV !)

      Now, the prices here for this Chaparral (probably the first of the ugly prototypes !) are up there...
      But this is breakthrough stuff. If a passible, smooth surfaced ABS body can be made using this 3D technology, the injected molded process will be right up there with the buggy whip.

      The cost of a 3D investment would have to be spread over the hundreds of models a biggy like Hornby or Carrera makes, but I'm thinking that it would be insanely profitable in the long run, allowing unheard of flexibility, and much shorter lead times in bringing product to market.

      Will we slotslut's ultimately see lower prices ? I wouldn't not count on it. I mean, they gotta pay for the 3D investment. But if this process change, makes the business more profitable, we may see more stuff, and more players in the market.

      I'm thinking that the over produced no selling dogs, would be recycled (re-using the plastic material )and converted into other models, requiring only a software change to "print" the new model". No sunk cost in expensive , worthless tooling to cover...

      Whoa !
      Last edited by ModelTrainGuy; 07-03-2015, 06:48 PM.

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      • #18
        I'd like to see a close-up of the body.

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        • #19
          Can't wait for mine to arrive! Awesome job. I hope this starts a trend to making the amazing CanAm cars, such as the Shadow DN4 and maybe the Lola T333 that was turned into a CanAm car later on. Lots of opportunities for some rare cars....just sayin.
          Ron

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          • #20
            From the talk by the source

            it appears bodies of very boxy shaped cars are first to be produced. But after some tweaking I'm sure smoother flowing subjects can come forward. I like the Cunningham idea (and do have a Top Slot Monstre) but have also wanted to see its stablemate "50 Caddy coupe. I think they'd make a nice set. Historically I believe the stock bodied car finished LM ahead of its sibling. And later the stock coupe could be offered as a Pan Am racer and maybe an early NASCAR bomber. I dream.

            Still its hard to order a 2J without at least seeing what we're buying.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Changing Gearz View Post
              The body is done through a completely different process.... There is still a laser - but it shoots into a bath of liquid resin
              That's SLA technology, thank you.

              Originally posted by Changing Gearz View Post
              .... Being liquid - it doesn't trap air and can capture extremely fine detail. Once it's printed - it cured under a uv light..... For 3D printing - it's as cutting edge as it gets.
              Not really, I held the first one in my hand 20 years ago

              Originally posted by Changing Gearz View Post
              The material is high impact ABS
              That's interesting, I didn't know that material was available from an SLA process. The marketing people always say that their new whizz-wow material is "equivalent to..." but in material tests it never is. I'll be interested to see how they look and how they survive.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Changing Gearz View Post
                Next car is a secret of course... should Be out around thanksgiving....

                any interest in sidecars ? I just found out about these but they have not been made 30 years. I would love to but these in a kit, maybe updated with a FF motor or even a slot.it pod.



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                • #23
                  The sidecar rigs would be cool! I am looking forward to the sprint cars!

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by choc-ice View Post
                    That's SLA technology, thank you.
                    Not really, I held the first one in my hand 20 years ago
                    That's interesting, I didn't know that material was available from an SLA process. The marketing people always say that their new whizz-wow material is "equivalent to..." but in material tests it never is. I'll be interested to see how they look and how they survive.
                    A couple of points about rapid prototyping. Around 1986 I started working on the SLA machine that was bought by Lockheed Skunk Works. I was a solid model designer working with the model shop and the SLA was a perfect fit for our work. So I guess that is almost 30 years ago...wow, that went fast.
                    I had very good success building aircraft models freestanding in the vertical position. Unless the aircraft had forward swept wings or some other shape like that I could build a whole airplane without support except for the very tip. Detail on the smooth shapes of airplanes was very good and reduced the ridges that would exist if the item was built horizontally. It would take more time to build but much less time to finish. FYI.

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