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  • #46
    "Best lap around 5.380, not fast enough."

    Interesting, that's as fast as the fastest lap of the STOCK Carrera C6.R!?! Not enough cornering speed indeed.

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    • #47
      If you saw this Lola fly down the straights and tiptoe through the corners, you would see what I mean. It's "tailly," as they say in Auslotland.

      In light of Reckless' question, I got out the feeler gauges (assorted bits of tubing and wire) and found clearance around .059", or 1.499mm. A few angles and corners of the chassis should be trimmed. As I said, things are warped and misaligned. But I think the next step is to dump the plastic, and cut out a brass plate from my sheet of .032" stock.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by beejay7
        Current progress on my Prototype car
        Alan --

        Is that a Mike Sells 312P resin body? Beautiful paint and decals! What did you use to seal the body?

        Bart

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        • #49
          Yabba dabba doo
          Last edited by bartbrn; 07-26-2006, 06:31 AM.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Robert Livingston
            Lola T70 Mk IIIB, Fly Classic, aspiring to competition in the GPR P class:
            Oh goody, another Lola T70 Mk IIIB!

            Bart

            PS:

            So whatcha gonna use for a chassis? Motor? Tires? Wheels? Since my chassis ideas seemed to be a bit overripe, I thought I'd get an idea what you're doing before I screw up mine!
            Last edited by bartbrn; 07-26-2006, 06:29 AM.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by bartbrn
              Oh goody, another Lola T70 Mk IIIB!

              Bart

              PS:

              So whatcha gonna use for a chassis? Motor? Tires? Wheels? Since my chassis ideas seemed to be a bit overripe, I thought I'd get an idea what you're doing before I screw up mine!
              I am going for the "silly English sports car" award. First the Marcos, now the Lola. I seem to be drawn to cars which suffered a lack of big buck factory support. However, a Ferrari 512S short-tail roadster is on order, so we shall see.

              Maybe I'll use double-wide Jel Claws tires. I have some Scalextric GT40 sized Jel Claws, four of 'em should be do for a 1971 Prototype, right?

              I am thinking of a brass plate with two brass rail arms soldered on, extended rearward on each side of the pod, to carry the rear end of the pod. Front end is two angle-bracket uprights for the front axle, and a separate guide tongue bolted on. 1/16" front axle, bushed to carry 3/32" bore, independent rotation front wheels. I've done it before and it works. No floppy pans, no batwings, no tubing, and no piano wire. A propane torch is all.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Robert Livingston
                I am going for the "silly English sports car" award. First the Marcos, now the Lola. I seem to be drawn to cars which suffered a lack of big buck factory support. However, a Ferrari 512S short-tail roadster is on order, so we shall see.
                Where the Chebby shows through the hole in the rear deck, I'm going to try to create a little model of the cam covers and intakes of the Aston-Martin V8, and do a faux-Surtees car (I have a strong suspicion they'd given up on the AMV8 by the time the Lola MkIIIB came out). Why in God's name did Fly load the back end down by jamming a a complete wheel and rubber tire in the arse-end of the thing?

                Originally posted by Robert Livingston
                Maybe I'll use double-wide Jel Claws tires. I have some Scalextric GT40 sized Jel Claws, four of 'em should be do for a 1971 Prototype, right?
                Have you used these yet? I've only seen them on that famous auction site, which gives me some pause. If "JEL CLAWS is a real company and not a basement industry casting silicone tires out of resin molds," why can't I find them anywhere else on the web? I have an inquiry into their head office, so we shall see.

                Originally posted by Robert Livingston
                I am thinking of a brass plate with two brass rail arms soldered on, extended rearward on each side of the pod, to carry the rear end of the pod. Front end is two angle-bracket uprights for the front axle, and a separate guide tongue bolted on. 1/16" front axle, bushed to carry 3/32" bore, independent rotation front wheels. I've done it before and it works. No floppy pans, no batwings, no tubing, and no piano wire. A propane torch is all.
                I'm trying to picture that front end -- help me out here -- but a propane torch? Don't you have great wompin' soldering iron?

                I'm thinking of a brass double-reverse Iso-Fulcrum with an Ulrich independent rear suspension and front fixed-camber hairspring ifs with sheet-lead and paxolin pickup guide.

                That's what I'm thinking about, but what I build will be something a LOT easier..

                Bart
                Last edited by bartbrn; 07-26-2006, 09:25 AM. Reason: had to whizz

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Robert Livingston
                  1/16" front axle, bushed to carry 3/32" bore, independent rotation front wheels.
                  Robert, you could always use the newer BWA wheels that are already drilled 1/16. That would save all the bushing of the wheels.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by dr vanski
                    I picked it up in an online auction. Unbeknownst to me, I was bidding against another SCI member: Monquispot, I believe.
                    That would be me. Maybe Monquispot, too.

                    **** you Vanski!



                    No big deal, really -- I'll just have to find a 936 elsewhere.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Bart

                      It is a TKP shell, (an off shoot of the French MMK organisation I think). The shell comes pre-painted and the decals come with it.
                      I sealed the shell with a product called Klear, which I understand is called Future in the States.

                      This range of resin shells is available in the States and you can find them on the Electric Dreams website, (although I paid a lot less for mine than the prices they are quoting).

                      Regards

                      Alan

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by beejay7
                        you can find them on the Hominahominahomina website, (although I paid a lot less for mine than the prices they are quoting).
                        Sic Semper Emptor! I've found that even with shipping from the UK, some specialty items are a LOT less expensive than buying from some online shill.

                        Beautiful job. I have a Mike Sells resin bod that I've been too lazy/nervous/trepidatious to paint, but seeing how nicely yours came out, I'm encouraged to make the leap of faith (in myself to NOT screw it up!)

                        Good on yer!

                        Bart
                        Last edited by bartbrn; 07-27-2006, 08:53 AM. Reason: completitude

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by ElSecundo
                          That would be me. Maybe Monquispot, too.

                          **** you Vanski!



                          No big deal, really -- I'll just have to find a 936 elsewhere.
                          I'll let you know if I see another in my travels. Sorry...a mint in bag 936 was to difficult to pass up for a Porschephile such as myself. First thing I did was carve the motor and axle stays from underneath that shell. The shelf queen collectors would be shocked!

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Need Help with the Lola!

                            Does anyone have a photo of the top of the engine in the rear deck of a Lola T70 Mk IIIB coupe? I am trying to make my Fly model a little more realistic. Near as I can tell, the Fly Chevy V8 with valve covers and fuel injection is a scaled up 1/32 smallblock. Many of the Lolas in '69-'70 are listed with about 5 liters (305 cu. in.), which would be small block territory, and consistent with the "Sports" rules of the day.

                            A real Chevy small block measures 19" from outside edge of valve cover to outside edge of valve cover. Each valve cover is 18" long. The Fly motor is 24" wide, and 22" long, beyond even a 1/30 scale rendition. The Fly engine scales closer to 1/25 scale than 1/32.
                            Last edited by Robert Livingston; 08-02-2006, 05:04 PM. Reason: 5.0 Liter Lola raced in "Sports", not "Prototype"

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                            • #59
                              The best I could find from this great photo page of cars that raced at the surreal Norisring circuit in Nurnberg:



                              A few more, but not what you're looking for:





                              The setup on each of those T70s is different. I'll have a look through some of my books when I get home from work late tonight.
                              Last edited by dr vanski; 08-02-2006, 03:41 PM.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Van, that is great. Those photos show that the motor is mounted lower than I had it, so that the valve covers would be well below the rear deck. I see a late-model Hamlyn T70 at Norisring. Great photos!

                                But what scale is the Fly model of the Lola?

                                Model Car & Track had an article on the earlier 1967 Lola T70 coupe, predecessor to the Mk IIIB, with these dimensions:
                                Wheelbase: 95"
                                Width overall: 74"
                                height: 38"

                                Road & Track (April '84) had an article about a street conversion of an early coupe, after it had become a "vintage" racer, giving these dimensions:
                                Wheelbase 94"
                                width overall 74"
                                height: 37.5"

                                Now, was the MkIIIB coupe of '69-'70 significantly wider than the earlier version?

                                The Fly model is 2.5" wide, or 80" if it is in 1/32, or 75" wide if it is in 1/30. If the real car is 74" wide, the Fly model scales out as too wide, even for our 1/30 allowance. Wheelbase is 101", 3.155" on the model.

                                Does anyone have the width dimensions for a late-model (4 headlights, 1970) Lola T70 Mk IIIB coupe? Dimension should be at the widest point, where the body flares over the rear tires.
                                Last edited by Robert Livingston; 08-02-2006, 05:00 PM.

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